Wells Family Genealogy

The study of my Family Tree

16 Oct 2016: Wonderful Images from a Bygone Era. October 16, 2016

While sorting through my Dad’s postcard collection I came across this little packet of pictures from the Europa:

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I’ve always been fascinated by these old ships.  Perhaps because I used to work on one, perhaps because I always wonder if someone’s immigrant ancestor came to America on her.  Either way, the photos in this little package are a wonderful peephole into what it would have been like to sail on such a beauty as the Europa.  Here’s a little info I dug up on her history:  (From Wikipedia)

SS Europa, later SS Liberté, IMO 5607332, was a German ocean liner built for the Norddeutsche Lloyd line (NDL) to work the transatlantic sea route. She and her sister ship, Bremen, were the two most advanced, high-speed steam turbine ocean vessels in their day.

Europa was built in 1929 with her sister ship SS Bremen to be the second 50,000–gross ton North German Lloyd liner. They both were powered with advanced high-speed steam turbine engines and were built with a bulbous bow entry and a low streamlined profile.

Europa and her slightly larger sister ship were designed to have a cruising speed of 27.5 knots, allowing an Atlantic crossing time of 5 days. This enabled Norddeutsche Lloyd to run regular weekly crossings with two ships, a feat that previously required three.

Here are the pictures in the pack:

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The Europa

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Dining Room on the Europa

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Swimming Pool on the Europa. (At first I thought this photo was upside down!)

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Ship’s Interior on the Europa

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Ship’s Interior on the Europa

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Ship’s Interior on the Europa

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Ship’s Interior on the Europa

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Ship’s Interior on the Europa

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Ship’s Interior on the Europa

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Ship’s Interior on the Europa

Anyway, I thought I’d share these photos.  Maybe it will inspire you to watch Titanic tonight.  🙂

-Jennifer

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One Response to “16 Oct 2016: Wonderful Images from a Bygone Era.”

  1. James Rogers Says:

    Interesting photos of luxury class accommodations. In 1870 a German great grandfather came over on a much more modest ship. Found a photo in “Ships of Our Fathers,” which showed both sails AND smokestacks! I’m sure it took more than 5 days, ad I suspect most of its 660 passengers were in steerage.


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