Wells Family Genealogy

The study of my Family Tree

The Hopkinton, Rhode Island Militia May 24, 2014

Below is a list of the men who served in the Second Company of the Hopkinton Militia in the Revolutionary War. If you see any X’s in my transcriptions, they are a placeholder for words/names I wasn’t able to make out.

2nd Company Hopkinton RI Militia Page 1

2nd Company Hopkinton RI Militia Page 1

2nd Company Hopkinton RI Militia Page 2

2nd Company Hopkinton RI Militia Page 2

 

A List of the 2 Company in Hopkinton

Capt George Thurston Jr

Lieut Matthew Randall

Ensign Randall Wells

Sergt Joseph Thurston

Sergt Clark Maxson

Sergt Joseph Maxson

Sergt XXXXX Sweet

Daniel Peckham, Clerk

Caleb Potter, Drummer

Willet Clark, Fifer

Nathaniel Kenyon, Armor

Corp John XXXXX

Corp Stephen Potter

Gideon Allen

XXXXX XXXXX (Name is unreadable. Might be David something)

Joshua Coon

William Coon Jr

John Coon Jr

John Vilot

Benajah Crandall (Probably really Benjamin Crandall)

Peleg Crandall

David Crandall

Stephen Randall/Crandall (I’m thinking it looks like Randall but seeing as he comes after a Crandall and before a Randall, it could go either way)

Joshua Randall

Clark Reynolds

Matthew Lewis, XXXX Lewis, Asa Lewis, Randall Lewis, Paul Lewis, Green Lewis

Job Thurston

John Burdick Jr, Jabez Burdick, William Harris Burdick, Amos Burdick

Perry Maxson

Thompson Wells

Joshua Collings, Jabez Collings, Nathan Collings, John Collings

Peter Kenyon Jr, Arnold Kenyon, George Kenyon, Wells Kenyon

Stephen Clark

XXXX (Henry?) Clark

Joshua Lanfier Jr, Rawlan Lanfier

Joshua Tanner, Nathan Tanner

Isiah Button, Rufus Button, John Bullon

Timothy Larkin

Francis Palmer, Nathaniel Palmer

Moses Hall

Ephraim Rogers, Amos Rogers

Benjamin Colgroove

John Stanbury (?), John Stanbury Jr (?)

Asa Hill

Briant Cartwright Jr

Samuel Witter

Joshua Nie

Daniel Crumb

Samuel Perry

Caleb Nie

James Braymon, Henry Briteman, Thomas Briteman, Joseph Briteman

David Davis

Jeffrey Champlain

Jonathan West

William XXXXX

Caleb Church

Elijah XXX (Miller/Millard?)

Amos Patersson (?)

Edward Harvy

Woodmon Wilber, Clarke Wilber

Joseph Cole Jr

Phineas Crandall

David Nichols

XXXX XXXXX

Nathan Crandall

Abraham Utter (?)

Elijah Hall, Ezekiel Hall Jr

Simeon Perry Jr

Stephen XXXXX (Millard?)

Asa Coon

Paul Maxson

Benjamin Langothy (Probably really Benjamin Langworthy)

XXXXX XXXXX

Nathan Larkin

 

Here is part of the Pension Application of Elizabeth Palmer, Widow of John Palmer.

John Palmer Pension Application Page 29

John Palmer Pension Application Page 29

 

John Palmer Pension Application Page 33

John Palmer Pension Application Page 33

John Palmer Pension Application Page 34

John Palmer Pension Application Page 34

Application of Elizabeth Palmer widow of John Palmer

Dated 3 February 1853

A coppy of the declaration of John Palmer

states that in January 1776 he inlisted into the services of the United Stated at Hopkinton county of Washington and State of Rhode Island under Capt Abel Tanner, Lieut Randall Wells and Ensign Joseph Maxson of the term of six months and marched with the forces to South Kingston and at Boston neck and near those places and continued in the service in guarding the shores six months and was discharged in South Kingston in July 1776 after serving the full term of six months as a private. His regiment was commanded by Col Joseph Noyes and Major Thomas Sheffield. Col Ray Sand commanded a Regiment part of the time at the time near him. That in April 1776 he was drafted into the service of the United States at Hopkinton aforesaid under Capt Elnathan Wells in a regiment commanded by Col Jesse Maxson and removed to South Kingston and Boston Neck where he continued for the full term of three months and was discharged at South Kingston as a private discharged in July 1777, that in May 1778 he was drafted at Hopkinton aforesaid and went into the service of the United States as a sergeant under Capt Abel Tanner in a Regiment commanded by Col Jesse Maxson and xxxx to South Kingston Boston Neck and continued at and near these places three months and a half and was discharged at South Kingston the first of August or first of September 1778 after serving the full term of three months and a half was on the main land at Point Judith through the engagement on Rhode Island in XXXX XXXX that in May 1780 he received a XXXX and commission from the Governor of the state of Rhode Island and in the same month to xxx in May 1780 he continued as Lieutenant in the service of the United State at Hopkinton County of Washington and State of Rhode Island under Capt Abel Tanner, Joseph Maxson was Ensign. Cal Shenbenn (?) commanded the regiment he marched with the forces to Warwick and xxx to Bristol to Tiverton Howlands ferry and to Foglan and continued at Foglan Howlands Ferry and near their in guarding the shores six months and was discharged at Howlands Ferry in November 1780. They had no general engagement in this o any xxxx while he was in the arm. There was no continental officers stationed with him but xxxx Col Ray Sands, Col Jesse Maxson, Col Joseph Noyes and Col or Major Charles Dyer were all in the militia service while he was in the service of the United Sates

 

Deciphering the handwriting gave me a bit of an education. What looked like “Now lands Gerry” turned out to be Howlands Ferry. Which in googling different permutations of that I came across this:  http://www.preservation.ri.gov/pdfs_zips_downloads/survey_pdfs/portsmouth.pdf

State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations Preliminary Survey Report: Town of Portsmouth (January 1979)

EARLY FERRIES

In 1640, the town voted to establish a ferry, which operated at the narrows of the Sakonnet River between Portsmouth and Tiverton. Eventually it became known as Howland’s Ferry after the family which operated it through most of the eighteenth century. The Bristol Ferry, established in 1680 between Portsmouth and Bristol, was one of the most important in Rhode Island, affording direct communications between Aquidneck and Providence, and a tavern and a wharf at a public landing were established in the seventeenth century.

Okay, that explained Howlands Ferry. It was figuring out that the “F” in ferry was really an “F” and not a “G” as it looked to me that lead me to figure out that what looked like “Gagnon” was really “Foglon”. After a little googling, I found that there is a place called Fogland Point south of what was Howlands Ferry. Located on the mainland, it juts out into the water. Google maps has 3 Rod Way/Fogland Point Road as the one road that leads out this outcropping of land.

 

I had to look up what is referred to as the “engagement on Rhode Island” and when I googled it found this image:

The Engagement on Rhode Island

The Engagement on Rhode Island

 

Using the date given as the date of the Engagement, I found the following on Wikipedia and surmise that what they’re really talking about is The Battle of Rhode Island

The Battle of Rhode Island, also known as the Battle of Quaker Hill and the Siege of Newport, took place on August 29, 1778. Continental Army and militia forces under the command of General John Sullivan were withdrawing to the northern part of Aquidneck Island after abandoning their siege of Newport, Rhode Island, when the British forces in Newport sortied, supported by recently arrived Royal Navy ships, and attacked the retreating Americans. The battle ended inconclusively, but the Continental forces afterward withdrew to the mainland, leaving Aquidneck Island in British hands.

The battle took place in the aftermath of the first attempt at cooperation between French and American forces following France’s entry into the war as an American ally. The operations against Newport were to have been made in conjunction with a French fleet and troops; these were frustrated in part by difficult relations between the commanders, and a storm that damaged both French and British fleets shortly before joint operations were to begin.

The battle was also notable for the participation of the 1st Rhode Island Regiment, a locally recruited segregated regiment of African Americans. It was the only major military action to include a racially segregated unit on the American side in the war.

 

 

 

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4 Responses to “The Hopkinton, Rhode Island Militia”

  1. Linda S-H Says:

    Found this while looking for info on Howland’s Ferry. One of my ancestors, Israel Bates, mentioned it in his pension application too (easier to read than John Palmer’s, I think!). Israel Bates was serving under John Sullivan, and was wounded in the battle of Rhode Island. And he remembered seeing the black troops. Your article is the first confirmation I’ve found of some of the things he mentioned. He never got his pension though, as nobody could find any ‘official’ records of his service. Thanks for a very interesting article.

    • jgeoghan Says:

      You’re very welcome. The reason I started this blog was to take the vast amount of research and records I have and share them with the world.

  2. Ginni Mayne Says:

    Hi! Found you when looking for specifics on the 2nd Company Hopkinton RI militia. I’m descended from Benajah and Peleg Crandall… Thanks for your hard work!

    • jgeoghan Says:

      Thanks. I wish I had more on the Hop Militia as well. When I read what little snippets I find, it’s always just a hint of some really interesting stories.


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