Wells Family Genealogy

The study of my Family Tree

Jan 1, 2011 – Franz Haver (Xavier) Kranz January 1, 2011

A while ago I came across the record below.  I think it found it on familysearch.org   It was listed as “Bavaria, Germany, WWI Personnel Rosters, 1914-1918 Record for Franz Xaver Kranz”.   I got excited as I thought he must be an uncle of mine, brother of John Kranz my immigrant ancestor from Arzheim Germany as the fellow here, Franz had the same names for his parents.  John or Johannes was born in Arzheim on December 10, 1872.  When I was up at the Family History Expo in Atlanta this past fall I had the opportunity to show the document to a great gal who worked for the Family History Library in the German section and she gave me the translation in the second picture.  So yes, this is my uncle Franz (or Haver/Xavier).  I knew I had an uncle Xavier as he was listed in the handwritten family history written by John pictured below.

So what does all this tell me?  Well it tells me that Franz/Xavier served in the Germany Military for quite some time and probably served in World War I by the dates.  It says he was single so I don’t know if he ever married or had children or if he even lived through World War I.   I can only hope so.  What it also tells me is that he propbably didn’t immegrate to America as he brothers John and Stefan did so I need to keep looking in German records for more info on him.

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Dec 13, 2010 – Elnathan Babcock of Hopkinton, RI December 13, 2010

Here are some more family related articles I found on genealogybank.com on Elnathan Babcock of Hopkinton, RI.   Elnathan was the son of Peleg Babcock and Elizabeth Wells.  He was born september 30th, 1790 and died May 26, 1858 in Washington County, RI.

This first article is from the Providence Patriot dated May 9th, 1827 and talks about what happened in the May Session of the General Assembly on 1827.  In the second column about 2/3 of the way down it says “The following members were not in their seats.-Elnathan W. Babcock of Hopkinton”… Babcock – Elnathan W Babcock Providence Patriot May 9th 1827

This second article is also from the Providence Patriot and is dated April 18th, 1829.  It lists town election results and says “Hopkinton – Jeremiah Thurston and Elnathan Babcock, in place of Edward Barber and Jonathan N. Hazard. … Babcock – Elnathan W Babcock Providence Patriot April 18th 1829

This first article is from the Newport Mercury dated September 3rd, 1831 and lists the results of the election of town representatives as members of Congress and Representatives fo the General Assemble of the State of RI.  For the Town of Hopkinton, Elnathan W Babcock, G.W. Arnold, T. Thurston and Edward Barber are elected…. Babcock – Elnathan W Babcock Providence Newport Mercury Sep 3rd 1831

Elnathan’s mother, Elizabeth Wells, was the daughter of Jonathan Wells Jr and Amy Rogers.  Jonathan Jr.was the son of Jonathan Wells Sr. and Elizabeth Maxson.

Elnathan was a Farmer by trade.  Here he is on the 1850 census with his family:

Elnathan is buried in First Hopkinton Cemetery in Hopkinton, RI.  Here is a picture of his headstone:

Here is a picture of the House Elnathan lived in in Hopkinton, RI:

The Jonathan Wells house (aka The Jonathan Wells – Elnathan Babcock House) is a post and beam 2 story house with center chimney and sits on 3.9 acres of land overlooking the Tomaquag Valley.  It has 3 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms and six working fireplaces, one with a working beehive oven and a smoke house in the attic.    Behind the house is a detached 2 car garage with a hay loft and a small barn.  A Late Victorian, wood-shingled barn is nearby.   I have seen it written many times that “Originally the house was part of the Jonathan Wells estate”.  I’ve never actually seen it written that he built the house.  Although he may have, all I can say with any degree of certainty is that he owned and was living in the house at the time of his death.

Jonathan Wells (6-22-1712 to 3-5-1772) has the distinction of being my 5th Great Grand Uncle and my 1st Cousin 5 times removed at the same time.  Jonathan is the son of my 6th Great Grand Uncle, Nathaniel Wells (1672-1768/9) who was the son of my 7th Great Grandparents Thomas Wells and Naomi Marshall.  This is how he is my 1st cousin 5 times removed.   He is my 5th Great Grand Uncle because he was married to Elizabeth Maxson, who was the daughter of my 6th Great Grandparents the Rev. Joseph Maxson and Tacy Burdick.

 The house has been called the Jonathan Wells-Elnathan Babcock House (or Ethnathan sometimes).  Figuring that Elnathan Babcock was probably another owner of the house I tracked him down.  

 Jonathan Wells had a son named Elnathan Wells (born ca 1737).  

Elnathan’s will dated 2 July 1804 mentions his nephews, Elnathan Babcock and Peleg Babcock.

Elnathan Babcock and Peleg Babcock Jr. were sons of Peleg Babcock Sr. & Elizabeth Wells.

Elizabeth was the daughter of Elnathan’s brother Jonathan.

So basically Elnathan Babcock was the grandson of Elnathan Well’s brother or you could say he was his great nephew.

Jonathan’s will reads:  “To the name of God Amen this fifth day of March in the year of Our Lord 1772, I , Jonathan Wells, of Hopkinton in the County of Kings County and Colony of Rhode Island, yeoman, being in health and of perfect mind and Memory, thanks be given to God, for the same and calling to mind the mortality of my body and knowing that it is appointed for all men once to die, do make and ordain this my last will and testament that is to say Principally and first of all I give and recommend my soul into the hands of God that gave it.  And for my body I recommend it to the earth to be buried in a christian decent manner at the descretion of my executor.  Nothing doubting but at the general resurrection I shall receive the same again by the mighty Power of God and as touching such worldly____ where with it hath pleased God to bless me in this life, I give, devise and dispose of the same in manner and form following that is today…..

Item-I give and bequeath to Rebeccah Wells, my dearly beloved wife, (NOTE: Jonathan married a second time to Rebecca Clagget after his 1st wife died) the one third of the use and profit of my real estate together with the best room and bedroom adjoining the same in my now dwelling house with the priviledge of the kitchen and buttery and cellar.  I likewise give to my said wife, two ____ and their furniture and two pots and a kittle and ice kittle and the silver teaspoons, tea tongs and silver strainer and a set of china cups and saucers and ditto of stoneware, two glass tumblers or baker glasses and teapot and her choice of the looking glass and six chairs and tea table and warming pan and two china bowls.

I likewise give to my wife, firetongs and _____ and the case of drawers and trunk and great chair and three basons, six spoons of puter, six plates and two platters and one tub and one pole and trammel and frying pan and three knives and forks, one large silver spoon, all the above articles I give to my said wife during the time she remains as my widow.  But if she marry, it is my will that she shall have no more than one good bed and furniture and eight dollars worth of the rest of the household stuffs as she wishes to have which shall be her estate forever at her disposal. 

Item-I give and bequeath unto my beloved sons, Elnathan Wells and Jonathan Wells all my real estate and all the rest of my personal that I have not already given away by this will after my last debts and funeral monies being first paid.  I give to my sons equally to be divided between them, my two farms to be divided by a northerly and southerly line ______ to quantity and quality and my said sons after dividing said farms shall come to for their choice of said land.  All said land I give to my sons and their heirs and assigns forever. 

And I do hereby constitute, ordain and appoint my aforesaid son, Elnathan Wells, my only sole executor of this my last will and testament.  I do hereby disallow, revoke and disannul all and every other former testaments, wills and legacies, bequeaths and executors by me in any way before this time named, willed and bequeathed.  Ratifying and confirming this as no other to be my last will and testament.

In witness thereof, I have here unto set my hand and seal the day and year before written.

Signed, sealed, published, pronounced by the Jonathan Wells as his last will and testament.

In presence of us the subscribers.

Witnesses:                                Jonathan Wells   (seal)

Ethan Clarke,  Daniel Clarke,  Joshua Clarke

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November 5, 2010 – Another Wells Mystery Letter (1866) November 5, 2010

Filed under: Uncategorized — jgeoghan @ 6:33 pm
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As I’ve mentioned before, I came across a seller on EBAY who was selling old letters from the 1800′s.  There seem to be folks who collect the envelopes for the stamps and cancellations by the post office.    I came across him because he was selling letters written to and from members of a Wells family.  Over the past few years, I’ve bought all the ones he sold.  I probably have about 10+ of them.  I lost one auction for a lot of 4 or 5 letters but I emailed the fellow who won and explained that I was interested in the letters for their genealogy content and he was kind enough to scan the letters for me.  I hope to someday find a descendant of these Wells’ and put the letters in the hands of someone who will appreciate them with the love that only a genealogist can have (you know what I mean).

Anyway, here is another one of the letters:

Mt. Vernon  Feb 2X, 1866

Dear Mary,

Your welcome letter we received and was glad + hear you arrived all safe  I should have written to you before this but for the last four weeks have been about half way sick  For two weeks I scarcely sat up_I am now able to be around the house and hope to regain my usual health in a few days  How is your health this winter  We often speak of you and wish we could run in and chat with you once in a while  For I can realize how very lonely you must be  Has Frank sold the homestead  Give my love to him and his Wife and tell them we shall be glad to see them   Your uncle has taken a severe cold (and has taken to the bed this afternoon he is now enjoying a good sleep) + hope it will not settle on his lungs.  We had a letter from Aunt Adeline  She though of going to visit Frances about the middle of last month, she though John would be able to go with her at that time as he was gaining his health quite rapidly  I have not answered her letter but intend doing so in a few days.  Give my love to Alice  Bessie will write her this evening. Our Christmas tree looked splendidly and such a time as we had getting home.  The rain just poured down and we got wet as drowned rats.  Remember to Solomon and his wife and Henry and his wife and tell them we shall be glad to have them visit us _ I Received a letter from Jeannie last month and as it may be interesting to you I will copy a part of it _ We have had a festival held on the evening of Jan 1st. at which we made something over $100 Henry procured Rev David Burt of Winona to deliver a lecture one of the finest we ever heard  250 or more persons were present and after the lecture we sold cake cold meat tarts by the plateful with a cup of excellent coffee accompanying each plate.  Besides several gallons of ice cream were sold _ then there was fine music both vocal and instrumental, and every body agreed in saying that they had a “profitable and pleasant time” for my own part I was glad when the 1st of January had come and gone.  What with family cooking, a house full of company to entertain children to look after responsibility and anxiety in regard to the festival and the unfortunate absence of my girl Rhonda (she went home to spend Christmas and froze her feet on the way) I felt fit for nothing for several days – She had taken her baby to the Hall and was helping set tables when Henry came and told her a company of six from St. Charles had come to attend the festival and was waiting for tea  They staid all night and to breakfast the next morning  I think she had a busy New Year don’t you  Do write again soon I remain as ever your affectionate Aunt

All send love to all            

Emma B Wells.

Here’s a recap of people mentioned in this letter:

From: Emma B Wells (Aunt)  Mt. Vernon

To: Mary (Niece)

        In Mt Vernon area with Emma:   Bessie

        In Mary’s Area – Unknown: Frank (selling homestead), Alice, Solomon and his wife, Henry and his wife

 Had a letter from Aunt Adeline (and John) to visit Frances

Jeannie (received a letter from)

So if you know exactly who these folks are, let me know.  I’m still working on it.  Will post more letters soon.

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November 3, 2010 – Cemetery of the Day November 3, 2010

Today’s Cemetery of the day is…  I.O.O.F Cemetery /Rhonnerville IOOF Cemetery, Fortuna, CA         (Humboldt Co.)   Cemetery is located at 5254 Rohnerville Road in Fortuna, CA. (707) 725-6459.   Fortuna is in between Rohnerville & Hydesville.  IOOF stands for the International Order of Odd Fellows which is some sort of fraternal type of organization.

Isaac Newberry(Newbury) Rogers  (May 20, 1823 – Sep 2, 1906) Isaac is my 2nd Great Grand Uncle.   His parents, Daniel Rogers and Sally Newbury, are in Union Cemetery of Waterford, Quaker Hill, New London, CT.

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November 2, 2010 Cemetery of the Day November 2, 2010

Today’s Cemetery of the day is…

Hillside Memorial Park, Redlands, CA  (San Bernardino Co.)  Cemetery is located at 1540 Alessandro Road (PO Box 3005) in Redlands, CA.   (909) 798 7569

Dr. Jacob Davis Babcock Stillman  (Feb 21, 1819 – Mar 2, 1888)  (Jacob is the son of Joseph Stillman the 3rd and Elizabeth Ward Maxson of Plainfield, NJ.)

Mary Gavitt Wells  Stillman   (Aug 26, 1833 – Jan 1923)  (Mary’s parents, William Davis Wells and Abby Gavitt, are in River Bend Cemetery, Westerly, RI)

 Children of Dr. Jacob Davis Babcock Stillman and Mary Gavitt Wells:

Mabel Stillman Morrison  (Sep 15, 1867 – Jul 19, 1941)       

            

Frank Pierce Morrison (Aug 31, 1859 – Mar 30, 1956 ) husband of Mable.        

       

Leland Stanford Stillman Sr. (Sep 8, 1870 – 1938 )            

                  

Ada Lombard Latimer Stillman (Sep 25, 1872 – Jan 1972 )  wife of Leland            

     

 Children of Mabel Stillman and Frank Pierce Morrison:

Laurence Stillman Morrison    (May 28, 1888 – Mar 31, 1974)    

Margaret Nordhoff  Morrison (May 1, 1892 – Jul 19, 1987 ) wife of Laurence      

 

William Pease Morrison ( May 28, 1895 – Nov 10, 1962)

Amy Morrison Phillips     (Sep 29, 1893 – Oct 4, 1968 )      

 Children of Leland Stanford Stillman Sr. and Ada L. Latimer:

Leland Stanford Stillman Jr.     (Jan 12, 1906 – 1937)

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November 2, 2010 – Altana M Wells Palmiter

Are you related to Altana M (Wells) Palmiter (1849-1912) daughter of Silas Wells and Hannah Davis Green?  If so, here is a photograph of her:

I don’t have a death date on her, just a year (1912) so if you have a day and month to go with 1912, I’d like to know what it is.  Altana photo was in my Wells family album of mostly unknown photographs.  I blogged about it a bit ago so scroll down and you’ll find it. She married Alanson Palmiter (year unknown – let me know if you know it).  They are both buried in Oak Grove Cemetery in Ashaway, RI.

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August 14, 2010 – Cemetery Book Finished!!!! August 14, 2010

Filed under: Uncategorized — jgeoghan @ 6:32 pm
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Yes, I finished my cemetery book this week.  A listing of all known burial places of my relatives and ancestors.  Came to something like 221 cemeteries!  I’ll be posting the whole book in parts as it’s a lot to scan all at once.  If they files take a bit to open, that’s because I tried to keep them in a higher resolution so they’d be easily readable but low enough that it wasn’t taking forever to open. 

Here is the book up to Connecticut:

Cemetery Book up to Connecticut

Here is Connecticut:

Cemetery Book Cal to Conn

A description of the short hand I use in the book is on page 2.  So if you don’t understand something, refer to that.  For the sake of space I had to abbreviate things like 2nd cousin 5 times removed is sometimes just 2/5.     Anyway, if you find my work useful, let me know.  My goal is to share all my knowledge of me family, so if you learn something, let me know.  It will make me happy to know I’ve helped you in any way.  

You can see that I have tried to get a photograph of every grave.  This is one way to verify that they are actually buried where I think they are.  In some instances, I “saw on the internet” that a relative was buried somewhere.  I take what I read on other sites very unseriously unless they are listing where they got the information from.  When I found a new ancestor, I’d list them on findagrave.com and put in a photo request.  Most times, I’d get a photo of the grave out of it.  Sometimes, I’d get a message that they went to the cemetery but couldn’t find the grave.   I’ve tried to note when that happened next to that person’s listing in the cemetery so that I’d know it needed further investigation.  It can be that the stone was destroyed or that its unreadable now or that they never had a stone at all and were buried unmarked (yes, I’ve found this is sometimes the case). 

Anyway, I’ll be posting the rest of the book over the next week when I scan the rest.  It takes a while to scan as I want to keep it a pretty high resolution so you can read it and see the pictures with some sense of quality.

Below is a list of all the cemeteries in my book. 

Alabama                                                                                                                     

Burdick Family Cemetery                    Houston                                                Winston Co.                        

Fairview Cemetery                               Double Springs                    Winston Co.                        

Forrest Cemetery                                  Gadsden                                                Etowah Co.                           

Tuscaloosa Memorial Park                 Tuscaloosa                           Tuscaloosa Co.                   

California                                                                                                                                                       

Hillside Memorial Park                        Redlands                               San Berardino Co.               

I.O.O.F. Cemetery/Rhonerville IOOF Cemetery Fortuna/Rhoberville          Humboldt Co                                       

Sunset Mausoleum                              Berkeley                                 Alameda Co.                        

 Connecticut                                                                                                                                                   

East Norwalk Historical Cemetery     East Norwalk                         Fairfield Co.                                          

Putnam Cemetery                                 Greenwich                             Fairfield Co                                           

Center Cemetery                                   East Hartford                        Hartford Co.                                         

Palisado Cemetery                               Windsor                                Hartford Co.                                         

Wethersfield Ancient Burial Ground  Wethersfield                       Hartford Co.                                         

Center Street Cemetery                      Wallingford                           New Haven Co.                                                                                   

Ancient Burial Cemetery                     New London                         New London Co.                 

Avery Stoddard Cemetery                  Ledyard                                New London Co.                 

Bill Hill Cemetery                  Lyme                                      New London Co.                                 

Brown Cemetery                                   North Stonington                 New London Co                                  

Cedar Grove Cemetery                        New London                         New London Co                                  

Congdon Street Cemetery                  Montville                               New London Co                                  

Comstock Cemetery                             Uncasville                             New London Co                                  

Congdon Street Cemetery                  Montville                               New London Co                                  

Darrow Farm Cemetery                        Waterford                              New London Co                                  

Duck River Cemetery                          Old Lyme                               New London Co                                  

Elm Grove Cemetery                            Mystic                                   New London Co                                  

Fox Cemetery                                        Oakdale                                  New London Co                                  

Gardiner Burying Ground                   Waterford                              New London Co                                  

Gardner-Bulkeley Cemetery                Bozrah                                    New London Co                                  

Griswold Cemetery                               Old Lyme                               New London Co                                  

Jordan Cemetery                                  Waterford                              New London Co                                  

Ledyard Union Cemetery                    Ledyard                                New London Co                                  

Linwood Cemetery                               Colchester                             New London Co                                  

Old Rogerene Cemetery                      Ledyard                                 New London Co                  

Old Rogers Cemetery                          Waterford                              New London Co                                  

The Old Stone Church Burial Ground  East Lyme                       New London Co                                  

Pendleton Hill Cemetery                 North Stonington                 New London Co                                  

Pepper Box Hill Cemetery                Waterford                              New London Co                                  

Plains Cemetery                                   Franklin                                  New London Co                                  

Randall Cemetery                             North Stonington                 New London Co                                  

Robert Stoddard Cemetery                 Unknown                               New London Co                                  

Rogers Cemetery                                   Montville                               New London Co                                  

Rogers Cemetery at Mamacock Farm  New London                      New London Co                                  

St. Michael’s Cemetery                       Pawcatuck                             New London Co                                  

Starr Cemetery                                      Groton                                    New London Co                                  

Union Cemetery                                   North Stonington                 New London Co                                  

Union Cemetery of Waterford           Quaker Hill                            New London Co                                  

Wells Cemetery                                    Groton                                    New London Co                                  

West Neck Cemetery                           Waterford                              New London Co                                  

Wightman Cemetery                            Groton                                    New London Co                                  

Yantic Cemetery                                   Norwich                                 New London Co                                   

Florida                                                                                                                                                            

Fernhill Memorial Park & Gardens    Stuart                                    Martin Co.                                            

Providence Cemetery                          Riverview                              Hillsborough Co.                                 

Shelfer Cemetery                                    Havana                                  Gadsden Co.                                        

 Georgia                                                                                                                                                          

Lithonia City Cemetery                       Lithonia                                 DeKalb Co.                                           

Illinois                                                                                                                                                            

Farina Cemetery                                   Farina                                    Fayette Co.                                           

Gilson Cemetery                                   Haw Creek                             Knox Co.                                               

Harshbarger Cemetery                        Haw Creek                             Knox Co.                                               

Rosehill Cemetery and Mausoleum Chicago                                                 Cook Co.                                               

Williamsfield Cemetery                       Truro                                      Knox Co.                                               

 Indiana                                                                                                                                                           

Mount Pleasant Cemetery                  Liberty Township                Delaware Co.                                        

 Iowa                                                                                                                                                               

Riverside Cemetery                                Riverton Township               Clay Co.                                                 

Spencer Cemetery                                   Stockport                                Van Buren Co.                                       

 Kansas                                                                                                                                                                       

Askren Cemetery                                 Yates Center                         Elk Falls Co.                         

Elk Falls Cemetery                                Elk Falls                                 Elk Falls Co.                                         

Yates Center Cemetery                        Yates Center                         Woodson Co.                                      

 Massachusetts                                                                                                                                                           

Central Cemetery                                   Beverly                                  Essex Co.                                              

Dodge Row Cemetery                         Beverly                                  Essex Co.                                              

Old Burying Ground                            Wakefield                              Middlesex Co.                                      

Old Reading Cemetery                        Reading                                  Middlesex Co.                      

South Burying Place                            Concord                                 Middlesex Co.                                      

Starks Cemetery                                   Hawley                                   Franklin Co.                                          

Wenham Cemetery                              Wenham                                Essex Co.                                              

West Whately Cemetery                    West Whately                      Franklin Co.                                          

 Michigan                                                                                                                                                        

Kalamo Cemetery / Hillside Cemetery  Kalamo                           Eaton Co.                                              

Lake View Cemetery                            Howell                                    Livingston Co.                                     

Memorial Park Cemetery                     Battle Creek                           Calhoun Co.                                         

Oak Ridge Cemetery                            Marshall                                Calhoun Co.                                         

West Clarendon Cemetery                 Clarendon                              Calhoun Co.                                         

 Minnesota                                                                                                                                                      

Riverside Cemetery                              Dodge Center                       Dodge Co.                                            

Wrightstown Cemetery / Woodside Cem. Wrightstown              Otter Tail Co.                                       

 Missouri                                                                                                                                                        

Lick Creek Cemetery                              Perry                                       Ralls Co.                                                

Lucerne Cemetery                                   Medicine Township          PutnamCo.                                             

Wolfe (Wolf) Cemetery                          Perry                                       Ralls Co.                                                

Wyreka Cemetery                                   Wyreka                                   Putnam Co.                                            

Union Chapel Cemetery                      Perry or Jasper                       Ralls Co.                                                

Nebraska                                                                                                                                                       

Hillside Cemetery                                 North Loup                           Valley Co.                                             

New Jersey                                                                                                                                                    

Fair View Cemetery                              Middletown                          Monmouth Co.                                    

First Presbyterian Church Cemetery Rockaway                              Morris Co.                                            

Hillside Cemetery                                 Plainfield                                Union Co.                                             

Hoboken Cemetery                              North Bergen                        Hudson Co.                                          

Saint Catherine’s Cemetery                Sea Girt                                  Monmouth Co.                                    

Valleau Cemetery                                   Ridgewood                            Bergen Co.                                           

 New York                                                                                                                                                       

Alfred Rural Cemetery                         Alfred                                     Allegany Co.                                        

Little Rhode Island Cemetery             Little Genesee                       Allegany Co.                                        

Mt. Hope Cemetery                             Friendhip                               Allegany Co.                                        

Nile Cemetery                                       Nile                                         Allegany Co.                                        

Pierce Cemetery / Hanneman Road Cemetery   Alfred   Allegany Co.                                        

Rogers Cemetery                                   Amity                                     Allegany Co.                                        

Stillman Cemetery                                Alfred                                     Allegany Co.                                        

Utopia Cemetery                                  Wirt                                        Allegany Co.                                        

Wells Cemetery                                    Genesee                                 Allegany Co.                                        

Seventh Day Baptist Cemetery          Preston                                 Chenango Co.                                      

Lake District Cemetery                        Wilna                                     Jefferson Co.                                                        

Union Cemetery                                   Adams Center                       Jefferson Co.                                        

Greigsville Cemetery                            Wadsworth                           Livingston Co.                                     

Barnard Cemetery/West Quality Hill Cem.       Sullivan                  Madison Co.                                        

Beaver Creek Cemetery / Beebe Cem.#11         Brookfield              Madison Co.                                        

Brookfield Rural Cemetery                                 Brookfield                  Madison Co.                                        

Burhyte Farm Cemetery #34               South Brookfield                 Madison Co.                                        

Clarke Cemetery #15                            Unadilla Forks                      Madison Co.                                        

South Brookfield Cemetery #27         Sout Brookfield                    Madison Co.                                        

Union Cemetery                                   DeRuyter                               Madison Co.                                        

Wells Cemetery                                    DeRuyter                               Madison Co.                                        

West Edmeston Cemetery #25           South Brookfield                 Madison Co.                                        

Spafford Cemetery                               Spafford                                 Onondaga Co.                                     

Calvary Cemetery                                 Canadiagua                           Ontario Co.                                           

Millville Cemetery                                Millville                                  Orleans Co.                                          

Mount Albion Cemetery                     Albion                                    Orleans Co.                                          

Union Cemetery / Pendry Cemetery  Albion                                   Orleans Co.                                          

Unadilla Forks Cemetery                     Unadilla Forks/Plainfield     Otsego Co.                                           

Brock Cemetery                                    Grafton                                   Rensselear Co.                                     

East Hollow Cemetery                         Petersburg                             Rensselear Co.                                     

Elmwood Cemetery                              Schaghticoke                        Rensselear Co.                                     

Hewitt Cemetery / Ziba Cemetery      Grafton                                   Rensselear Co.                                     

Lewis Hollow Road Cemetery            Petersburg                             Rensselear Co.                                     

Meadow Lawn Cemetery                    Petersburg                             Rensselear Co.                                     

Moses Cemetery                                  Petersburg                             Rensselear Co.                                     

Oakwood Cemetery                             Troy                                       Rensselear Co.                                     

Old Grafton Center                               Grafton                                   Rensselear Co.                                     

Stephentown Center Baptist Cemetery  Stephentown                   Rensselear Co.                                     

Stillman Village Cemetery               Petersburg                             Rensselear Co.                                     

Wells Cemetery                                    Petersburg                             Rensselear Co.                                     

Worthington Moses Cemetery          Petersburg                             Rensselear Co.                                     

Yellow Meeting House Cemetery      Stillwater                                Saratoga Co.                                        

Holy Sepulcher Cemetery                   Coram                                     Suffolk Co.                                           

Long Island National Cemetery              Farmingdale                             Suffolk Co.                                             

 Ohio                                                                                                                                                               

Beckett Cemetery                                 Waterford                              Washington Co.                                  

Cedar Hill Cemetery                             Waterford                              Washington Co.                                  

Greenlawn Cemetery                            Lowel                                     Washington Co.                                  

Hesson Cemetery                                 Caldwell                                 Noble Co.                                             

Howell Cemetery                                  Jackson Center                     Shelby Co.                                            

Moss Run Cemetery                            Moss Run                             Washington C.                                    

The Mound Cemetery                         Marietta                                 Washington Co.                                  

Nye Cemetery                                       Chauncey                              Athens Co.                                           

Seventh Day Baptist Cemetery          Jackson Center                     Shelby Co                                             

Tunnel Cemetery                                   Warren Township                Washington Co.                                  

Waterford Cemetery                            Waterford Village                 Washington Co.                                  

Willow Branch Cemetery                    Waynesfield                         Auglaize Co.                                        

Wooster Cemetery                               Wooster                                Wayne Co.                                           

 Oklahoma                                                                                                                                                      

Bryon & Amorita Cemetery                Amorita                                  Alfalfa Co.                                            

 Oregon                                                                                                                                                                       

Idlewild Cemetery                                Hood River                            Hood River Co.                                    

Mountain View Cemetery                   Hood River                            Hood River Co.                                    

Rest Haven Memorial Park                 Eugene                                  Lane Co.                                               

River View Cemetery                           Portland                                 Multnomah Co.                                   

Salem Pioneer Cemetery                      Salem                                     Marion Co.                                           

Silk Creek Cemetery                             Cottage Grove                      Lane Co.                                               

Willamette National Cemetery           Happy Valley                        Clackamas Co.                                     

 Pennsylvania                                                                                                                                                  

Arlington Cemetery                             Drexil Hill                               Delaware Co.                                        

Bell Run Cemetery                               Ceres Township                   MeKean Co.                                         

Burdick Cemetery                                 Clifford                                   Susquehanna Co.                                

Girard Cemetery                                    Girard                                     Erie Co.                                                 

Hebron Cemetery                                 Hebron                                   Potter Co.                                             

Hillside Cemetery                                 Roslyn                                   Montgomery Co.                 

Monongahela Cemetery                     Braddock Hills                      Allegheny Co.                                     

Old Wells Cemetery                             Oswayo                                 Potter Co.                                             

Salunga Mennonite Cemetery           Salunga                                  Lancaster Co.                                       

Wells Cemetery at Oswayo                Sharon Township                                Potter Co.                                             

 Rhode Island                                                                                                                                                 

East Burial Ground                               BR004     Bristol                                    Bristol Co.                                            

Baptist Berkleys White Hall Farm/Hubbard Lot MT056  Middleton                     Newport Co.                                         

Clifton Burial Ground                          NT014    Newport                                 Newport Co.                                         

Common Burial Ground                       NT003    Newport                                 Newport Co.                                         

Friends Cemetery                                 JM006    Jamestown                            Newport Co.                                         

North Burial Ground                            PV001     Providence                            Providence Co.                                    

Swan Point Cemetery                          PV003     Providence                            Providence Co.                                    

Chimney Orchard                                                      Hopkinton                             Washington Co.                                  

Clark Ground                                         WY045 Westerly                  Washington Co                                   

Clark Ground                                         WY056 Westerly                  Washington Co                                   

Crandall Family Burying Ground       WY015 Westerly                  Washington Co                                   

Edward Bliven Lot                               HP019     Hopkinton                            Washington Co                                   

Elias Lewis Lot                                     WY012   Westerly                               Washington Co                                   

Eldridge Crandall Lot                           SK094     South Kingstown                 Washington Co                                   

First Hopkinton Cemetery                  HP022     Hopkinton                             Washington Co                                   

General George Thurston Lot            HP017     Hopkinton                             Washington Co                                   

George Babcock Lot                            SK045     South Kingstown                 Washington Co                                   

George Babcock Lot                            HP026     Hopkinton                            Washington Co                                   

Hopkinton Historical Cemetery #32  HP032     Hopkinton                             Washington Co                                   

James Babcock Lot                                WY007   Westerly                                Washington Co.                                  

James Ross Lot                                       WY027   Westerly                                Washington Co                                   

New Fernwood Cemetery                   SK007     South Kingstown                 Washington Co                                   

Niantic Lot                                                WY020   Westerly                               Washington Co                                   

Oak Grove Cemetery                            HP018     Ashaway                               Washington Co                                   

Old Fernwood Cemetery                     SK006     South Kingstown                 Washington Co                                   

Pine Grove Cemetery                           HP004     Hope Valley                          Washington Co                                   

Rhode Island Veterans Cemetery                      Exeter                                     Washington Co                                   

River Bend Cemetery                           WY008   Westerly                               Washington Co                                   

Riverside Cemetery                              SK043     South Kingstown                 Washington Co                                                   

Rockville Cemetery                              HP006     Hopkinton                             Washington Co                                   

Seventh Day Baptist Church Cemetery            Ashaway                               Washington Co                                   

Spicer Lot                                                  HP015     Hopkinton                            Washington Co                                                   

Stillman-Crandall Lot                           WY016 Westerly                  Washington Co                                   

Their Crandall Ground                         WY055 Westerly                  Washington Co                                   

Thomas Webster Lot                          SK137     South Kingstown                 Washington Co                                   

Thompson Wells Lot                          HP044     Hopkinton                             Washington Co                                   

Wells Lot                                                HP025     Hopkinton                             Washington Co                                   

 Tennessee                                                                                                                                                     

West Tennessee State Veterans Cemetery      Memphis                               Shelby Co.                                            

 Vermont                                                                                                                                                         

Kingsley Cemetery                              Bennington                           Bennington Co.                                   

Meeting House Hill Cemetery            Brattleboro                            Windham Co.                                       

Old First Church Cemetery /Old Bennington Cem. Bennington  Bennington Co.                                    

 Virginia                                                                                                                                                          

Arlington National Cemetery             Arlington                               Arlington Co.                                       

Dale Memorial Park                              Midlothian                            Chesterfield Co.                                   

 Wisconsin                                                                                                                                                      

Evergreen Cemetery                            Albion                                    Dane Co.                                               

Fassett Cemetery                                     Edgerton                                Rock Co.                                               

Johnstown Center Cemetery              Johnstown Township         Rock Co.                                               

Milton Cemetery                                  Milton                                    Rock Co.                                               

Milton Junction Cemetery                  Milton                                    Rock Co.                                               

Rock River Cemetery                           Milton                                    Rock Co.                                               

Walworth Cemetery                             Walworth                              Walworth Co.                                      

Wood National Cemetery                   Milwaukee                             Milwaukee Co.                                     

 England                                                                                                                                                          

Bath Abbey / Abbey Church of Sts Peter & Paul       Bath               Somerset                                               

Brookwood Cemetery                                Brookwood                           Surrey                                                   

St. Lawrence Churchyard Cemetery  Lydeard St. Lawrence         Somerset                                               

 Philippines                                                                                                                                         

Manila American Cemetery & Memorial                          Manila, Philippines

.

Come visit my website at www.FamilyHistoryDetectives.net and let us help you trace your family tree!

 

August 2, 2010 – Samuel Hubbard & Baptist Berkley’s August 2, 2010

Yes, it’s been a while since I’ve posted here on my blog.  I’ve been working day and night to finish my cemetery project before my birthday.  Yesterday my computer had an incident that deleted 90 pages on my project.  sigh.  I had saved a copy of it about a month ago and have been working on reconstructing it.  Luckily I had printed out a hard copy of it the day before so I have something to work from.  I could have sat down and had a good cry about it but didn’t.  I somehow thought something good has to come of this and today it did.  In retyping what was lost,  I got up to an entry for what I have called “Baptist Berkley’s White Hall farm on Rhode Island”.  It is where Samuel Hubbard (1610-1689), his wife Tacy Cooper (abt 1608-abt 1697) and some of their kids and grandkids are supposed to be buried.  I had found this reference to it somewhere on the internet a while back:

From: The Literary Diary of Ezra Stiles, Vol. 3, p.82: “A singular gravestone:

“Ebenezer”  Samuel Hubbard aged 10 of May 78 years

Old Tase Hubbard aged the 27 Sep 79 years and 7 mons 4 Jen Maryed 51

Years 1688 14 Vpsal 4. God have given us 7 children 4 dead 3 living

Ruth Burdick 11, 1 dead, 10 living    Rachael Langworthy had 10 children 3 dead 7 living.     Bethiah Clark 9 Living

Great Grandchildren 

Naomi B Rogers 1 dead 4 alyfe    Ruth B Phillips 1 dead 4 alyfe                          Judah C Maxson    Thomas Burdick

“I took this inscription off a gravestone in a family burying place on Baptist Berkleys White Hall farm on Rh. Isld, about A. D. 1763. Collector Robinson bought the Lease about 1765 and demolished the gravestones and put them into a wall: so that all is lost. From a loose paper which I, wrote in 1763 I now copy here. This Samuel Hubbard was a Baptist Teacher, settled at Newport about 1648 and made this Eben. 1688. Intricate as it seems, more is contained on this stone than can be given in other words in so small a space. I think 1688 must be a year common to Four dates. I should suppose the stone erected Sep 27, 1688, when the wife was aged 79 and 7 mo., and Mr. Hubbard was aged 78 on May 10 that year and on 4 Jany they had been married 51 years. The 14 Vpsal 4 is the 145th Psalm and the 4th verse—’One generation shall praise thy works to another.’ The B and C, I think a beautiful way of expressing lineal Descents. Thus Naomi B Rogers, I take to be Naomi Burdick who married Rogers—so Judah C Maxson was the Daughter of Bethiah Clark and it will be read Judah Clark Maxson.”

I have to admit, I had written this place off as unfindable.  But today as I was typing it, something told me to google it again.  I did and found this…

From: Middletown Historical Cemeteries "Death Comes Once But A Cemetery is forever" compiled by Mike O'Shea Norfolk, Virginia Page 124-125.    Hubbard Lot: Samuel Hubbard Death 1639. Foot Stone ... Location: Located on Bishop Berkley' White Hall Farm Actual site not located... This sole surviving stone and foot stone are all that remains of a small family cemetery. It was found near the door step of White Hall in the flower bed. "the original cemetery was dismantled by Collector Robinson about 1765 after he bought the lease on the property. All of the original grave stones were placed into the rock wall. The remainder of the stones are most likely still retained in one of the many rock walls on the property. This stone and the accompanying foot stone are now located at Paradise School. Headquarters of Middletown's Historical Society.  This very archaic inscription was hand etched into a common field stone Although it is colonial style English, enough of it can be transcribed to enable us to conclude that it is the marker for the grave of Samuel Hubbard.  According to existing records he was born about 1610 in Mendelsham. Suffolk Co., England and died in Newport R.I. about 1689.  There is little doubt that his wife and many other descendents are also buried on the property of White Hall. "The literary Diary of Ezra Stiles Vol. III" contains an inscription of a singular stone which he transcribed himself in 1763 prior to the cemetery's destruction. 'the literary Diary of Ezra Stiles Vol., III”

I emailed the Middletown Historical Society and also the Whitehall House Museum to see if I could get any information on the foot stone.  I’m praying they get back to me with a photo or some information.  How exciting!  Here’s a link to the Whitehall House Museum: http://whitehallmuseumhouse.org  I’m putting it on the list of places to visit on my next trip up to Rhode Island.

Here is who I believe are buried here although I’m sure there’s probably a bunch more:

Hubbard, Samuel  (May 10, 1610 – May 10, 1689)   8th Great Grandfather     (Samuel is the son of Yoeman James Hubbard and Naomi Cooke of Mendelsham, Suffolk, England)

Hubbard, Tacy Cooper  (About 1608 – About Sep 27, 1697/8)  8th Great Grandmother

Children of Samuel Hubbard and Tacy Cooper:

Burdick, Ruth Hubbard (Jan 11, 1640 – 1690/91 )7th Great Grandmother  (Ruth’s husband was Rev. Robert Burdick )

Langworthy, Rachel Hubbard (Mar 10, 1641/42 – After Sep 17, 1699)  8th Great Grandmother (Rachel’s husband was Andrew Langworthy.  Their granddaughter, Ann Langworthy, married Joseph Crandall Jr.)

Clarke, Bethiah Hubbard   ( Dec 19, 1646 – Apr 17, 1707)  8th Great Grandmother   (Bethiah was the wife of Joseph Clark Jr. Children of Ruth Hubbard and Rev. Robert Burdick:

Rogers, Naomi Burdick  (1658 – Jun 1732)7th Great Grandmother  (Naomi was the wife of Jonathan Rogers Sr. )

Phillips, Ruth Burdick   (1660 – 1730 )  6th Great Grand Aunt  (Ruth was the wife of John Phillips )

Burdick, Thomas   (1656 – Jun 1732 ) 6th Great Grand Uncle  (Thomas was the husband of Martha Randall )

.

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July 1, 2010 – Elder John Crandall Homestead, Westerly RI July 1, 2010

Today I’m going to talk about Elder John Crandall of Westerly, RI.  John was born in 1617 in Wiscombe, South Leith, Devonshire, England to James Crandall and Elizabeth Drake.  He died Nov 29, 1676 Newport, Newport Co., RI.  He mostly lived in Westerly, RI.   He was married 2 times.  To Hannah Gaylord and to Mary Opp.   He is buried in the Crandall Family Burying Ground in Westerly which is just a little ways from the house he built.  This house still stands and is still occupied by a member of the Crandall family.  A few years back the family donated the land to the local native american tribe in order to avoid the town of Westerly repossesing the land for back taxes owed.    Here are a few pictures of the House, built by Elder John Crandall also his barn and the family cemetery:

OK, I’m copy and pasting in how I’m related to Old John Crandall.  Here’s how it goes.

Elder John Crandall 1617-1676…My 8th Great Grandfather.  Married two times: To Mary Opp & Hannah Gaylord

Mary Opp 1620-1670(My 8th Great Grandmother)           Hannah Gaylord 1646-1678(My 8th Great Grandmother)

John & Mary had:                                                                John & Hannah had:
Rev. Joseph Crandall 1661-1737                                       Peter Crandall Sr.1654/5-1734

Joe married Deborah Burdick1660-1737                            Peter married Mary Babcock 1672-?

Joe and Deborah had 3 children:                                       Peter & Mary had:

#1.Deborah Crandall 1675-1737                                        Peter Crandall Jr.1690-1734

Deborah married George Stillman II,1678-1760                Peter married Mary Burdick 1695-?

 (See Stillman pages for the rest)                                       Peter and Mary had:

#2. Joseph Crandall II 1684-1750                                      Samuel Crandall 1724-1813

Joseph married Ann Langworthy 1690-1773                   Samuel married Hannah Clark  abt 1747-?

Joseph & Ann had:                                                             Samuel and Hannah had:

Joseph C. Crandall III        1716/7-1792                           Jane Crandall 1765-?

Joseph married Elizabeth Crandall 1717/8-1772               Jane married ?

 (They were 1st Cousins. See Below)                 Jane and ?? had:

#3. John Crandall 1682-1767                                             Brg.General Clark Crandall 1785-1862

John Married Mary Yeomans 1685-?                                Clark Crandall married Amelia Jane Vincent 1788-1869

John & Mary had:                                                                Clark & Amelia had:

Elizabeth Crandall 1717/8-1772                                         Orpha Crandall 1814-1880

Elizabeth married Joseph C. Crandall III 1716/7-1792    Orpha married Phineas Crandall Stillman 1809-1892

Joe was her 1st cousin, see above                                      They were distant cousins, see other side

Elizabeth & Joe had:

Phineas Crandall 1743-1821

Phineas Crandall married Ruth Rogers 1748-1783

Phineas & Ruth had:

#1. Lydia Crandall 1782-1865

                Lydia married Russell Wells 1780-1859

                Lydia and Russell had:

                Jonathan Russell Wells 1819-1864

                Jonathan married Martha Ann Rogers 1830-1903

                Jonathan & Martha Ann had:

                William Rogers Wells 1855-1926

                William married Pauline Rudiger Stillman 1855-1922

                (See Below)

#2. Esther Crandall 1775-1864

                Esther married Maxson Stillman Sr. 1774-1857

                Esther & Maxson had:

                Phineas Crandall Stillman 1809-1892

                Phineas married Orpha Crandall 1814-1880

                Phineas and Orpha had:

                Pauline Rudiger Stillman 1855-1922

                Pauline married William Rogers Wells 1855-1926

                Pauline & William had:

                Elliott Ellsworth Wells 1900-1951

                Elliot married Florence Weber 1902-1961

                My MOTHER-

                My Mother  married MY FATHER-

                Me – Jennifer!

_______________________________

Here are a bunch of references to John that I’ve found over the years.

From: Representative Men and Old Families of Rhode Island: Genealogical Records, By Higginson Book Company, 1997 (In the Newport Public Library)

 Reverend John Crandall the first American ancestor of the Crandall’s came from Wales to Boston, Mass in 1634/35. He was a Baptist minister and was among those that were persecuted in the Boston Colony and so fled to Rhode Island to find the freedom of thought denied them in Mass. He settled first in Providence in 1637 and later in Westerly, R. I. where he became the first elder.  

On July 21, 1651 he and John Clarke and Obediah Holmes were thrown into prison in Boston for preaching and on July 31 he was sentenced to pay a fine or be publicly whipped. He and his followers were instrumental in the settlement of Westerly but later he and his family moved to Portsmouth to escape the Indians and there died in 1676. He was one of the first preachers of the old Seventh Day Baptist Church.

Twice married, his second wife’s name was Hannah Gaylord and his children were John, Jane, Sarah, Peter, Jseph, Samuel Jeremiah and Eber. From this source came all the early families of the name in Rhode Island and Conn. as well as those that settled in New York. Pg 1115 of same book John Crandall appears at Newport R.I. as early as the year 1651 where he was associated with the Baptists. He subsequently became the first elder of that denomination at Westerly. He was a freeman in 1655, was commissioner several years 1658 – 1662 inclusive. He had a half a square assigned to him at Westerly in 1661, was deputy in 1667 and again in 1670-71, He died in Newport having moved there on account of the Indian War.

_____________________________

 From: Elder John Crandall of Rhode Island and His Descendants, by John Cortland Crandall, New Woodstock, New York, 1949

 JOHN CRANDALL, Colonial pioneer, First Baptist Elder, Deputy Commissioner, and statesman of Newport and Westerly, Rhode Island, the head of the Crandall family in America, was born in Monmouthshire, England, on the line between England and Wales in 1612. His mother is supposed to have been a Scotch lady. He came to Boston within a very few years after the landing of the Pilgrims, in 1634. Several writers have ascertained that he was associated with the Congregational Church at Salem as 1635 and that “he was certainly living in Providence as early as 1637″ and while there are many reasons for believing these statements correct and that John Crandall was a close associate of Roger Williams was one of the founders of Providence, unfortunately it seems impossible certainly to confirm them. Many of the original Providence records were early destroyed.

 The first valid documentary account of John Crandall in New England shows him to have been actively identified with the Baptist Church in Newport, July 21, 1651. His name next is found, with that of Matthew West in the Freemen’s list of Newport, 1655.

 John Crandall was the first Baptist Elder at Westerly, “Elder Crandall was well calculated both by talent and sufferings to lead his people in their devotions. He took an active part In the border difficulties between Massachusetts and Connecticut and subsequently between Connecticut and Rhode Island, concerning the lines between the states.”

 “With other founders of Westerly Mr. Crandall settled on the Misquamicutt land before 1665. He was commissioner for a number of years, served as deputy from both Newport and Westerly, and in other capacities which evidence that he was a man of importance. Through the seven sons of Elder Crandall the name became a common one and the family numerous in Rhode Island.” (From “Representative men and old families of Rhode Island”.) ………

 Elder John Crandall died before November 29, 1676 at Newport where he was sojourning on account of the Indian War (King Philip’s War).

 The “Journal of American History” gives the following sketch of the life of Elder John Crandall, which is substantially correct with the probable exception of the account of his activities prior to 1651

As early as 1635 Rev. John Crandall, who is believed to have been of Welsh ancestry, was  living in Salem where, as elsewhere in the Massachusetts Bay Colony, there was at this time  much opposition to all dissenters from the authorized tenets of the Puritans. John Crandall was  the minister of the Salem church, but he adopted the opinions of the Baptists, which were very obnoxious to the Congregationalists, and in the autumn of 1635 he was dismissed as pastor. As    did so many others of the early Baptists of New England he determined to settle in the  Narragansett country. The Indians proved friendly and he obtained from them a grant of land.  He has been called one of the founders of Providence. He was certainly living in Providence as  early as 1637.

 In 1669 he appears in “a list of the Free Inhabitants of the Town of Westerle” May the 18, (John Crandall’s name headed the list). Directly after this he, with Tobias Saunders, was authorized by the colony to summon juries and hold corts, they being appointed “Conservators or His Majesty’s Peace.”

 John Crandall was one of the original purchasers from Chief Sosoa of Narragansett of the Misquamicutt tribe, of the land comprising Westerly, from which Hopkinton was later formed. The townships of Westerly, Hopkinton, Charleston and Richmond, as they now are, were a tract called by the Indians Misquamicutt and on August 27, 1661 John Crandall was one of the nine signers of a petition to the Court of Commissioners for the Colony of Providence Plantations, in session at Portsmouth, for the purchase of that part of the tract which became Westerly. His house was near Burdens Pond and a part of it now stands, as one room in the homestead occupied by lineal descendants, of the ninth and tenth generations. Across from the house in the old orchard field is the original cemetery, in which twenty seven bodies are buried. There are three rows of graves containing nine bodies each. These rows of graves run parallel with a swamp near by. Elder John is buried in the row nearest the swamp in the end grave to the left as one stands facing the swamp. Next to his grave is that of his son John. Each of the twenty seven graves is indicated by a field stone some 14 inches in width, appearing four to eight inches above the ground set at the head while a smaller stone marks the foot of the grave. There is no inscription on any of the stones. On the 6th day of October 1932 A. Julian Crandall of Ashaway, Rhode Island and Rev. Wm. S. Crandall of Binghamton, New York, standing in the little historical burying ground, agreed that a suitable marker should be placed thereupon. They further concluded that a large native field granite boulder with a bronze plaque properly lettered, embedded in the same would be most suitable. The two third cousins resolved that they would sponsor the project. He was the first Baptist Elder at Westerly and held a number of public offices at various times. In 1658, 1659, 1662, 1663 he was a Commissioner, and was a Deputy to the General Court in 1667, 1670 and 1671, representing Westerly during the two latter terms.

 He had lived prior to his settlement at Westerly, at Newport.

 There was much dispute between the colonies of Massachusetts and Connecticut as to their jurisdictions, and especially as to jurisdiction over grants in Rhode Island, which however, had been confirmed by a royal charter to their purchasers. A claim was made in 1662 by Connecticut of land reaching beyond Misquamicutt to Narragansett Bay. On October 17, 1667, a letter was sent by the Connecticut authorities, to those of Rhode Island complaining that John Crandall had taken possession of about a square mile of land, which he had laid out to his sort, on the west side of the Pawcatuck River. On May 14, 1669 he and Joseph Torrey were appointed commissioners for the purpose of conferring with the Connecticut authorities concerning these land disputes. Certain individuals lent thirty five shillings to the Colony of Rhode Island in order to pay the expenses of Mr. Crandall to Connecticut. A few months later, on November 18, the governor and assistants of Connecticut sent a letter complaining that John Crandall and some others had appropriated a large tract of land in the township of Stonington, Connecticut. A reply to this complaint was sent by the Town of Westerly on March 11, 1669, signed by John Crandall and Tobias Saunders, in which all illegal seizure of land or other offense against the Colony of Connecticut was denied, and a counter charge was made; “but we are very sensible of great wrongs that we have sustained by them for many years.” In 1671 the dispute grew so serious that Mr. Crandall, with others, were actually carried off by the Connecticut authorities and was imprisoned at Hartford. On May 2, of that year the Rhode Island assembly advised him not to yield to Connecticut’s claims and assured him of the Colony’s support and that his financial losses would be borne by the Colony.

 The Reverend John Crandall was twice married. The name of his first wife is unknown, but she died in 1670 and was buried on August 2 of that year. He married, second, Hannah Gaylord.

 The subjoining summary recorded events in the later life of John Crandall “of Newport and Westerly, Rhode Island” is from Austin’s Authoritative Volumes “Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island,” and “One Hundred and Sixty Allied Families of Rhode Island.”

 John Crandall was early associated with the Baptists, at Newport, subsequently becoming the first Elder of that denomination at Westerly.

 1651, July 21. He, with John Clarke and Obediah Holmes, “being the representatives of the Church of Newport, upon the request of William Witter, of Lynn, arrived there, he being a brother in the Church, who by reason of his advanced age, could not undertake so great a journey as to visit the church. William Witter lived about two miles out of Lynn and the next day being Sunday, they spent in religious services at his house, and were there apprehended by two constables at the instance of the Massachusetts authorities, while Mr. Clarke was preaching, and the next morning they were sent to prison in Boston. For the dire offense of holding this little meeting, and on other frivolous pretexts Obediah Holmes was fined, imprisoned and whipped.

 1651, July 31. He was sentenced to pay a fine of 5 pounds or be publically whipped. He was released from prison upon his promise of appearing at next court.

 1658; 59; 62; 63 Commissioner.

 1661, August 27, he and eight others signed a letter of the Court of Commissioners of Rhode Island, concerning a tract of land at Westerly, that they and others desired approbation and assistance of Rhode Island in settling upon.

 1661, September 9. He had half a share at Westerly assigned him.

 1667, Deputy.

 1667, October 17, Westerly. He was complained of in a letter from Connecticut to Rhode Island authorities, for having come on west side of Pawcatuck River and laid out about a mile square of land to his son.

 1669, May 14. He and Joseph Torrey were appointed Commissioners to treat with Connecticut relative to jurisdiction of lands. The sum of 35 shillings was lent to the Colony of Rhode Island by individuals for John Crandall’s voyage to Connecticut.

 1669, May 18. His name was on the List of Inhabitants. (Westerly)

 1669, November 18. A letter was sent him by Governor and Assistants, of Connecticut, complaining that he and others had appropriated a great parcel of Stonington township, and seeking for satisfaction.

 1669, March 11. He and Tobias Saunders answered on behalf of Westerly denying any guilt in matter complained of, “but we are very sensible of great wrongs we have sustained by them several years.” The letter closes: “As for your advice to agree with those, our neighbors of Stonington and the other gentlemen we hope that your colony and ours, will in the first place lovingly agree, and then we question not but that there will be an agreement between us and our neighbors of Stonington, and the rest of the gentlemen.”

 1670, June 19. He as Conservator of the Peace of Westerly, wrote a letter a little prior to this date, to the Governor of Rhode Island, informing him “of an entrance made into our jurisdiction by some of Connecticut, and of their carrying away some inhabitants prisoners.”

 1670, August 2. His first wife was buried.

 1670, October 3. He deeded eldest son, John of Newport, “for love &c., all my good, chattels, debts, household utensils, and all other personal estate, movable or immovable quick or dead putting him in quiet and peaceable possession by payment of is in silver, by his son.”

 1670, 1671. Deputy from Westerly.

 1671, January 30. Bills were allowed by Assembly, for hire of a boat to go to Narragansett with Mr. John Crandall Sr. in the year 1670 and for hire of Sarah Reape’s horse for use of Mr. John Crandall to go to Hartford.

1671, May 2. He, having been “as is asserted” apprehended and now is in durance, by the Colony of Connecticut and having desired the advice of the Governor &c. of Rhode Island whether to give bond or abide imprisonment, the Colony will bear his charges and endeavor to justify his actings therein.

 1671, May 6. He was allowed 20 shillings, to bear his charge to Connecticut.

 1675, January 23. In a letter from Ruth Burdick, to her father Samuel Hubbard, of Newport, she says, Brother Crandall hath the ague and fever still, and have been but little amongst us this winter, Sister Crandall is brought to bed with a son, and is in a hopeful way.” (Ruth Burdick’s daughter Deborah (Samuel Hubbard’s granddaughter) later married Elder John Crandall is son (by his first wife) Joseph. He died in Newport, having moved there on account of the Indian War.

 1676, November 29. Under this date Samuel Hubbard, writes from Newport to Mr. Edward Stennitt in London, and after speaking of the devastation caused by King Philip’s War, he recounts the recent deaths in the First Baptist Church: He says: “of the old church, First Mr. Joseph Torrey, then my dear brother John Crandall, then Mr. John Clarke, then William Weeden, a deacon, then John Salmon; a sad stroke in very deed, young men and maids to this day I never knew or heard the like in New England.” Samuel Hubbard also wrote a few years later; “my dear brother John Crandall of Squamicut, is dead and his first wife a Sabbath keeper, the first that died in that blessed faith in New England.”

 His second wife was Hannah Gaylord, born 30 Jan. 1647, and probably was daughter of William and Ann (Porter) Gaylord, of Windsor, Connecticut. The said Hannah married a Crandall as is shown by the settlement of her brother Hezekiah Gaylord’s estate in 1677.

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 The Incident in Boston

 From: “State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantation at the End of the Century: A History” edited by Edward Field; 1:89; The Mason Publishing Company; Boston, Massachusetts; 1903 (974.5 RI/History SCGS)

 “To all of these assignments of her territory, Rhode Island made a vigorous protest. At this time when the interchange of warnings and summons could have engendered little good feeling between the two

colonies, there occurred an exhibition of Puritan intolerance which must have obliterated what little friendship there was left.

1651, July: Three members of the Newport church John Clarke, Obadiah Holmes, and John Crandall were deputed to visit an aged fellow member, who was residing near Lynn. Scarcely had they arrived and begun holding worship in the house when they were arrested, “being strangers“. A few days later they were tried at Boston, charged with being Anabaptists, and heavily fined. Holmes, for refusing to pay his fine, was so unmercifully beaten with a corded whip that it was a torture for him to move for many weeks afterwards. Thus did the Massachusetts clergy, through the fear of being deprived of their

temporal power, repress those who dared to worship God in their own manner. Bigoted as they were, they could not heed Clarke’s prophetic warning that the “forcing of men in matters of conscience towards God to believe as others believe, and to practise and worship as others do, cannot stand with the peace, liberty, prosperity and safety of a place, commonwealth, or nation”.

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 From: A Crandall Heritage and Legacy, by Julian Titsworth Crandall

 1651 July 21 – He, with John Clarke and Obediah Holmes being the representatives of the Church or Newport, upon the request of William Witter, of Lynn, arrived there, he being a brother of the Church who be reason of his age could not visit the Church. William Witter lived two miles from Lynn and the next day being Sunday they spent in religious services at his house and were apprehended by two constables at the instance of Mass. authorities, while Mr. Clare was preaching and the next morning they were sent to prison in Boston For the dire offence of holding this little meeting and on other frivolous pretexts, Obehiah Holmes was fined and imprisoned and whipped.

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 From: Swamp Yankee from Mystic, A Family, A Region and It’s Roots, By James H Allyn,Page 7:

 Although the Congregationalists had renounced the forms of the Church of England, they insisted that all should follow the Congregational rules of conduct. Sixty people were excommunicated from the church. There were too many to banish, but they were forbidden to bear arms. They were not the only ones with whom the Boston authorities had to contend. A small group on Noodles or Noddles Island, in what is now East Boston, had formed a Baptist Church. They were a branch of the church formed some years before in London, and held meetings in Bell Lane, Smithfield. The Baptists and Quakers were outlawed in 1644. Whatever chances there might have been to compromise were lost when Winthrop died in 1649. The next year Endicott banned all churches except the Congregational.

Roger Williams had moved across the Sekonk to settle Providence. In 1638 other Baptists settled on the north end of Aquidneck Island. Three of them, John Clarke, John Crandall (Elder John Crandall) and Obediah Holmes, went to visit an aged brother, William Witter, living in Swampscott outside of Lynn, to preach to him and his family. The three were arrested and brought to court. Cotton charged that the enormity of the crime, denial of infant baptism, would overthrow religion and the government, and was a capital offense. He argued that the prisoners were self-murderers. Governor Endicott pronounced the death sentence, but changed it to whipping or fines. Holmes’ fine was 30 Pounds, a ten years’ income for a person on relief. Clarke’s fine was 20 Pounds and Crandall’s 5 Pounds. Clarke proposed that the three of them debate with three Boston ministers, to which Cotton agreed. However, the three ministers could not agree on their arguments, so the debate did not take place. Without his knowledge or consent, some of Clarke’s friends paid his fine and he was released. Holmes was whipped unmercifully and could not rest, except on his hands and knees for some weeks. When Holmes was untied from the whipping post, a Mr. Hazel, cousin of Samuel Hubbard, shook his hand. Hazel was so severely beaten because of this handshake that he died at the home of a friend in Boston.

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 Winthrop as mentioned in the previous reference is: John Winthrop: One of the founders of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, Winthrop arrived in 1630 aboard the flagship Arbella. As governor of the Colony, he established the center of government at Boston. On board the Arbella, he prepared and delivered his famous sermon “A Model of Christian Charity.” In this speech, without using those words, Winthrop introduces the concept of Manifest Destiny: “For wee must consider that wee shall be as a citty upon a hill. The eies of all people are uppon us.”

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 Baptizing the Rogers

 From: History of the Rogerenes, Pages 131-132

 (1674) Near the close of this eventful year, Mr. James Rogers sends for Mr. John Crandall to visit at his house. Mr. Crandall has, for some time, been elder of the Baptist church at Westerly, an off­shoot of the Baptist church of Newport. He has recently gone over with his flock to the Sabbatarian church of Newport. If the subject of possible persecution in Connecticut is brought up, who can better inspire the new converts with courage for such an ordeal than he who has been imprisoned and whipped in Boston for dar­ing to avow his disbelief in infant baptism and his adherence to the primitive mode by immersion? The conference is so satis­factory, that Mr. Crandall baptizes John Rogers, his brother James, and the servant Japhet. — (Letter of Mr. Hubbard.)

News of the baptism of these young men into the Anabaptist faith by Mr. Crandall, at their father’s house, increases the com­ment and excitement already started in the town. The minister, Mr. Simon Bradstreet, expresses a hope that the church will “take a course” with the Rogers family. The Congregational churches at large are greatly alarmed at this startling innovation in Con­necticut.

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 From: Seventh Day Baptists in Europe and America: A Series of Historical Papers

By Albert N. Rogers, Seventh Day Baptist General Conference, Pages 646-

While the beginning of the history of Seventh-day Baptists in the vicinity of Waterford was in 1675, only nine years after the members of the Baptist church began to keep the Sabbath in Newport and Misquamicut. Just how the people about New London had their attention directed to the subject does not appear in the original documents, but we know that they were only twenty miles from the Sabbath-keepers in western Rhode Island and fifty from those in Newport and that the families were connected by marriage. The first mention of Sabbath observers here is in a letter which Ruth Burdick wrote March 6, 1675, from Westerly to her father, Samuel Hubbard, in Newport. The letter reads:

 “I judge it my duty to make use of this opportunity to impart to you the dealings and good hand of our God unto us. He hath been at work, as we believe, in the hearts of some of the inhabitants
of New London, and bowing their hearts to be obedient unto the Lord Jesus. The names of them is John Rogers, James Rogers his brother and the third an Indian whose name is Japheth: who gave a very satisfactory account of the work of grace wrought upon his heart. There be four more that sent to us desiring our prayers for them, and as for our part, we five are in love, and with one heart in what is revealed. As for Brother Randall he is highly displeased with brother Maxon about the Sabbath. Brother Crandall hath the ague and fever still, and has been but little amongst us this winter. Upon the I3th day of this month our brethren came again from New London to give us a visit and to partake in the ordinance of breaking of bread : with them another young man who is satisfied as to baptism but judges himself unfit. They declaring what joys and comforts they have found, and what they have met with from the sons of men. Mr. Bradstreet. the minister of the place, being enraged threatened them, warning them not to speak to any of his church, railing against us all that profess believers only to be baptized. Threatened Brother Crandall, saying he shall be ordered next court. Mr. Fitch of Norwich also said lie did hope the next court would take a course with Brother Crandall. Many such like words from many others we hear of. They have earnestly (requested) us to give them a meeting at our brother John Rogers’ house; but I fear brother Crandall’s weakness of body will hinder him, and here is none able to carry on the work there among them. For my part and I think many more would be very glad to see brother Hiscox here, and one more with him, and send them word a week before to give the people notice: they judge there would be many that would be there to hear and some to be baptized.”

It appears from this letter that Elder John Crandall had already been in New London witnessing for the truth, that he had baptized and received into fellowship John and James Rogers and an Indian named Japheth, that he had been threatened by the authorities, that there were others who were interested, that those received into fellowship had been to Westerly twice, joining with the Sabbath-keepers there in the celebration of the Lord’s Supper, and that it was desired that some one be sent from Newport to New London to carry on the work already commenced. The Newport church responded at once to the request and Mr. Hiscox, Mr. Hubbard and Joseph Clarke were sent this same month.

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 Miscellaneous

 From: “Early Settlers of Westerly, Rhode Island” by J. D. Champlin of Stonington, Connecticut” from the “Genealogies of Connecticut Families: from the New England Historical and Genealogical Register” Gary Boyd Roberts; p. 673;

 1669, May 18: John Crandall appeared on “A List of the free inhabitants of the towne of westerle” as the owner of lot #36 in the Westerly purchase.

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 From: Colonial Baptists: Massachusetts and Rhode Island, By: Edwin S. Gaustad [Ed.]: Arno Press, New York, 1980. p 119.

 On 14 Apr 1668 he participated in a religious debate in Boston, MA. He is called “Grendall of Narragansett.”

*This is a pun referring to the character “Grendel” in the Anglo-Saxon epic poem Beowulf.

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 From: Civil and Military List of Rhode Island 1647-1800 by Joseph Jencks Smith, 1900, Page 6

 The First Officers of the Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations

1669:    General Sargent:            James Rogers

            Conservators of the Peace:

                        Misquamsacutt & Westerly:

                                    John Crandall, Tobias Saunders

 From: Civil and Military List of Rhode Island 1647-1800 by Joseph Jencks Smith, 1900, Page 7

 1670. June        Messengers to Connecticut:

                                    John Crandall, Joseph Torrey, Jr.

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 From: Elder John Crandall, the Miller, By Judith C. Harbold, November 2000…This article appeared in the Dec 2000 issue of the C.F.A. newsletter.

 We can learn some things about our ancestors by looking into the lives and writings of people who lived in the same places at the same time. Thomas Minor was a contemporary of our immigrant ancestor, John Crandall (1617/8 – 1676). They lived in the same early Colonial area and certainly knew one another. And, fortunately for us, Thomas Minor wrote a diary.

 Thomas Minor came to New England in 1629 from Somerset County, England. First in Salem, he also lived in Charlestown and Hingham, Massachusetts. After a grant of land by the General Court of Massachusetts, a group of men including Thomas Minor founded a plantation in the Pequot territory, now New London, Connecticut. Later, about 1653, Thomas Minor made his permanent homestead in “Quiambaug,” in the town of Stonington, Connecticut. It was then he started his priceless diary, which he continued until 1684. Later Thomas’s son Manasseh also wrote a diary from 1696 to 1720.

 Calendars and almanacs were not readily available and the diaries served to mark the days and briefly record events of family and community interest. We learn when Thomas sowed “turneps,” visited with Mr. Winthrop and less famous friends, when his wife fell off her mare and when she fell out of the “canoow.” We learn of marriages, births, baptisms, deaths of family and associates. He tells us of snowstorms, floods and stolen shirts. Thomas Minor mentions the price of land, tax rates, town meetings and murder investigations.

This selection of events is meant to supplement information about the family of John Crandall, a first settler of Westerly, Rhode Island, however the entire diary is fascinating and informative. Thomas Minor is an ancestor of many of us who are also descendants of John Crandall.

 1667 July…..”saterday the .20 day I was at Crandals mill wensday night 24th the great land fflood” p. 80.

 1667 August…..”wensday the .7. I was at mr Stantons as I went to Crandalls” p. 80.

 1668 July…..”wensday the 8. I was at Crandals mill” p. 85.

 1668 August…..”the ffifte day wensday I was at Crandals mill saterday the .8. Crandall and his wife was heare” p. 86.

 1669 December…..”wensday .29. I was at Crandals mill” p. 93.

 1670 July…..”thursday 21. mr Crandale was heare I had fouer loads of oats” p. 97.

 1670 August…..”The 2 day of Agust 1670. Crandals wife was buried” p. 97.

 1671 January [new style dating]…..”The .10. day of Januarie 1670. the Court about Crandall and lewis was at mr stantons house.” p. 100.

 1671 April…..”the .8. day saterday we wer Laying out Land at the Est side poquatuck River” p. 102.

 1671 May…..”munday .29. the Towne meeting wenesday 31. we wer at Crandalls and sanders to serve Summons.” p. 103.

 1671 July…..”The 24 day wensday samuell was at Crandals mill::” p. 104.

 1673…..”wensday .24. I was at Crandalls mill” p. 119.

 1675-6 [The Indian wars were heating up and endangering scattered homesteaders in Westerly. As a consequence, many settlers, including John Crandall, moved to Newport safely located on the island of Aquidneck. John Crandall died while he was in Newport.]

 1681 July…..”the 30 day I was at Crandalls mill” p. 167.

 1681 August…..”Tusday .23. I was at Crandals mill” p. 168.

 1682 September…..”the .7. day I was at Crandals mill” p. 174.

 1716 June, Manasseh Minor’s Diary…..”22 I went to Crandals mill” p. 131.

 This seems to indicate that the elder John Crandall was a miller in his years at Westerly. In these entries, Thomas Minor does not mention wood or timber that one might take to a sawmill, but he does mention farming oats, wheat, and “corne.”

There was only one Crandall family in the New England Colonies in the 1600s. We know that the first John Crandall in Westerly spent a good deal of time on civic and religious activities, and all colonists participated in farming, but did our ancestor have another profession? What do you think? Was Elder John a miller? Who carried on the mill after Elder John died?

John Crandall’s first son, John Crandall was born about 1649, and would have been 18 or 19 years old in 1667, the first time Thomas Minor mentioned Crandall’s mill. Furthermore, we know from Land Evidence records that John2 became a blacksmith. Thomas Minor mentions Crandall’s wife in 1668 and 1670. John2 was not married until 1672.

The other sons would have been 16 years old and younger.

The mention of Crandall’s wife’s burial date is certainly John’s first wife. It seems likely to me that if there were more than one Crandall in his writings, Thomas Minor would have distinguished them in various entries as has been seen in certain public records where the son John is listed as Junior.

There is a Rhode Island historical marker on Route #3, between Westerly and Ashaway, at the intersection of Chase Hill Road. It marks the location of an early ford of the Pawcatuck River, the first mill dam and grist mill. It is at the foot of a knoll where Peter Crandall, son of Elder John, in 1680, donated land for the first church in that area, a Seventh Day Baptist Church. There are many references in the early town records of Peter Crandall’s mill.

All the evidence indicates that it could be only Elder John who owned and operated the mill. He was not, of course, “Elder” then. But that is another story. The entries above which do not mention a mill, show involvement that both John Crandall of Rhode Island and Thomas Minor of Connecticut had in the historical boundary disputes between the two states. There are many other entries on that subject. Again, that is another story.

 Reference: The Minor Diaries, Stonington, Connecticut; Thomas 1653-1684; Manasseh, 1696-1720. Originally published in 1899. [Re] Published by John A. Miner, Boxborough, Massachusetts, 1976.

Note: The scarcity of punctuation and run-on sentences make it difficult to distinguish exact dates in some cases. For some generations, the Babcock name was spelled Badcock.

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 From: The Early History of Narragansett, By: Elisha R. Potter Jr.   Published MDCCCXXXV, Collections of the Rhode Island Historical Society Vol. III, Page 241-242

 Petition to the Assembly.

To the Honorable Gentlemen of the Court of Commissioners ,assembled together in his Majesty’s name for the colony of Providence Plantations at Portsmouth the 27th of August, 1661.

Please ye honored Gentlemen, there being an opportunity or presentment of a certain piece or tract of land, lately discovered or made known; which tract of land lyeth in a situation in the furdest or remotest corner of this Colonies jurisdiction, called by the name of Ascomicutt: which tract of land is fairly promised or ingaged to a sartaine number of adventurers upon the design of purchase of it: which adventurers are members of this Colony and well wishers thereto: who desire to do nothing that shall prove prejudicial to the interest and honour of the Coloneys privileges or advancement : but are now confronting the adversaries of the Colony : which by a species of intrusions are seeking to make inroads upon our privileges of Colonies jurisdiction; the premises considered, your petitioners are bold under correctin to pray in ease we can make the adversarie: which is both to the colony and us to retreatt, which we question not: in point of right and title from the natives: therefore we being willing to proceed in all poynts of loyallity that may suit with the advance and honor of the colony, we humbly crave your favorable approbation countenance and assistance to us in the settleing of a plantation on Towneshepe: in or upon the above said tract of land called by the name Aacomieutt, which number of persons may probably extend to the number of 80, 40 or 50 or thereabout which are thence to inhabit, thearof many of an persons constrained to make inquisition and seek out for land for a comfortable livelyhood. So honored gentlemen if it be your pleasure to grant your petitioners request or petition as we are, so we subscribe and remain your humble petitioners and servants to our power for ourselves and in the behalf of the rest of our company.

WILLIAM VAHAN, + his mark.

JOHN COGGESHALL,

JOHN CRANDALL,                           HUGH MOSIEUR,

JAMES BARKER,                                CALEB CARE,

JAMES ROGERS, I B his mark.

JOSEPH TORRY,                  JOHN CRANSTON.

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From: The Early History of Narragansett, By: Elisha R. Potter Jr.   Published MDCCCXXXV, Collections of the Rhode Island Historical Society Vol. III, Page 250-251

 These articles of agreement made in the year one thousand six hundred and sixty or sixty-one, March the two and twentieth, between us whose names are underwritten, about a tract of land bought of an Indian captain called Sosooa, of Narroganset, the land being called Misquamakuck, as appeareth by deed by us John Fairfield, Hugh Mosher,. Robert Stanton and James Longbottom:

First, that we whose names are abovewritten, do give, grant, ratify and confirm the same privileges with ourselves, unto all those names are underwritten, according to their proportion of land in the aforesaid purchase.

2ly. That all we whose names ate underwritten, or the major part of us may transact any thing that we see cause in or about the aforesaid land.

3ly. That if any of us transact any thing about the aforesaid land, without the consent of the whole, or the major part, shall be disowned and of none effect.

4ly. That all charges that hath been already out about the aforesaid land, shall be repayed to the disbursers suddenly without delay, so soon as the disbursers bring us their account to the rest of the company.

5ly. That each of us whose names are here underwritten, or shall be hereafter added, shall bear equal charges to what have been out already, or shall be out hereafter, In any case about the land aforesaid, according to the proportion of land they have.

6Iy. That what changes shall be out from time to time, shall be brought in twenty days after they shall have warning from us or the major part of us.

71y. In case that any bring not their money as is above-said, nor give satisfaction to the company, shall forfeit their land, and what they have been out already.

81y. That the deed and all other writings about the aforesaid lands, shall be kept in William Vaughan’s house, and that each of the purchasers shall have (if they desire it) a

copy of the deed or any other writings that thereto belong, paying for the draught thereof.

9ly. The parties that have interest in the aforesaid land are, William Vaughan having a whole share, Robert Stanton having a whole share, Hugh Mosher having a whole share, John Fairfield having a whole share, James Longbottom baying a whole share, Shubal Painter having a whole share.

lOly. Whosoever that we shall agree with, shall have a proportion of the land aforesaid, shall have the same privileges as ourselves, provided that according to his proportion he set to his band to these or the like articles.

11ly. That we shall meet to consult about the aforesaid land so often as occasion shall present, at William Vaughan’s house.

l2ly. That to all the aforesaid articles we engage each to other to be faithful and true to perform the aforesaid articles that here Is above written, whereto we set to our hands.

 Hugh Mosher,                      William Helmes,                   William Vaughan,               William Weeden,

John Fairfield,                     John Maxson,                      James Longbottom,             Joseph Clark,

John Green,                          Pardon Tillinghast,            Jeremy Willis,                       John Nixson,

John Coggeshall,                                Antony Ravenscroft,            Edward Smith,                     James Babcock, Sen’r.

John Crandal,                      John Room,                           James Rogers,                      William Codman,

James Barker,                      William Dyre, Sen’r.            William Slade,                      George Bliss,

Henry Timberlake,              John Richmond, Junr.        Ed. Greenman,                     James Sands,

Fit. Richmond,                     John Tiler,                            Edward Larkin,                   John Lewis,                          

Sbubal Painter,                   Hugh Parsons,                     John Cranstone,                  Francis Braiton,

Caleb .Carr,                         William Foster,                    Joseph Torry,                       John Havens,       

Robert Carr,                         Jefferey Champlin,              Tobias Saunders, Richard Morris,

Henry Basset,                       John Tripp,                           William Gingill,                   Lawrence Turner,

Obadiah Holmes,                 Robert Burdick,                  Jireh Bull,                             Emanuel Wooley,

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From: Westerly and It’s Witnesses, Page 282

 Crandall Ground (2): This is found about forty rods west of the Pound Road, and west of the Old Crandall house (now the residence of Mr. Charles Crandall), and without inclosure.  None of the fifteen or twenty graves are lettered. 

Here lie the remains of John Crandall, 1st, and his two wives; (Mary Opp & Hannah Gaylord)

John Crandall, 2nd, and his wife Anna; Esther, Lewis, Hannah and Joshua Crandall;

Lydia Crandall, lst wife of Charles; John Crandall, son of Charles.

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 From: “Early Settlers of Westerly, Rhode Island” by J. D. Champlin from the “Genealogies of Connecticut Families: New England Historical and Genealogical Register” Gary Boyd Roberts; p. 676;

 1676, November: In a letter from Samuel Hubbard to Dr. Edward Stennett, pastor of a Baptist Church in Bell Lane in London, England, dated Newport, Rhode Island, appears the following:

“Now, dear brother, although we are not destroyed by the Indians, God hath visited this land by taking away many by death and, in this place of all sorts. Of the old church, first Mr. Joseph Torrey; then my dear brother John Crandall; then Mr. John Clarke; and then William weeden, a deacon; then John Salmon.”

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During King Philip’s War, there were several deadly encounters that pitted colonist against colonist and even Native American against Native American. Ironically, King Philip was the name given the Native American leader named Metacom (Metacomet). Legend has it that Elder John Crandall died as a result of an infection from wounds he suffered fighting with the Narragansetts against militia from Connecticut, Massachusetts and Plymouth and their Pequot and Mohican allies in the Great Swamp Fight in December of 1675. The tragic war claimed over 600 colonists and 3,000 Native American lives, caused devastating damage to the colonies and nearly wiped out the Narragansett and Wampanoag as organized tribes.

.( 8/1/2011 NOTE: If you’re interested in this post, check out my post on June 30, 2011 with Elder John’s Baptismal Records)

Come visit my website at www.FamilyHistoryDetectives.net and let us help you trace your family tree!

 

June 30, 2010 – Randall and Russell Wells June 30, 2010

Todays ANCESTOR OF THE DAY IS ….. Russell Wells, my Great, Great, Great Grandfather.  Son of Randall Wells Sr. and Lois Maxson, Russell was born September 30, 1747 in Wellstow, Washington County, RI.  He married Lydia Rogers Crandall in 1770 and died in the Fall of 1821 in Hopkinton, RI.

Here are my nots on Russell in my genealogy program.

From: Washington County, Rhode Island Births 1770-1850, By Alden G. Beaman, Ph.D.  1976  Page 177

Wells, Russell of Randall & Lois  1780 Ho

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It’s likely that Rusell was born in his father’s house.  Randall’s house is still standing in Ashaway, RI.  Here is a picture of it:


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1810 Federal Census, Hopkinton, RI

Head of Household: Russell Wells ….. Males 26-44 years old: 1
Females under 10 years: 1 ….. Females 16-25: 1
(Would have been Russell, Lydia and daughter Sylvia)
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1830 Federal Census, Hopkinton, RI

Head of Household: Russell Wells ….. Males 10-15 years: 1 (Jonathan or Thomas, -Silas too old)
Males 40-50: 1 (Russell) ….. Females 5-10: 1 (Lucy Ester)
Females 20-30: 1 (Probably Sylvia, but maybe Louis)
Females 40-50: 1 (Lydia)
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1840 Federal Census, Hopkinton, RI

Head of Household: Russell Wells
Males 20-30 years: 1 (May be a different number-hard to read) (could be Jonathan, Thomas or Silas)
Males 60-70: 1 (Russell) ….. Females 20-30: 1 (Louis)
Females 50-60: 1 (Lydia) ….. Total in Household: 7
Number of persons employed in Agriculture: 1
Number of persons employed in Manufacture and Trade: 1
Number of persons employed in the Navigation of the Ocean: 2
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1850 Federal Census, August 9th, 1850, Hopkinton, RI

Russell Wells ….. Age: 69 ….. Occupation: Farmer
Place of Birth: RI ….. Others living in same household: Lydia (wife)
Louis and Oliver Buddington are listed just before them on the Census.  Probably lived next door or close by.
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From the Sabbath Recorder – October 13, 1859
“In Hopkinton, R.I. Oct. 4th, Mr. Russell Wells, aged 79 years.  Mr. Wells was a brother of the late Elder Varnum Wells.  Two of his sons from the enterprising firm of Wells & Co., Manufacturers at Ashaway.  Mr. Wells was formerly a member of the church, but of late years lived quite a retired life.


_____________________________
BURIAL: He is burried in Oak Grove Cemetary in Ashaway, Rhode Island.
On thier tomb stone is inscribed”
Let me go where saints are going…To the Mansions of the Blest
Let me go where my Redeamer …Has prepared his peoples rest
I would gain the rhelms of brightness …Where they dwell forevermore
I would join the frineds that wait on the other shore.


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DEATH: Rhode Island Death Records:
From: http://www.geocities.com/sneezykat2003/NewEnglandWells/RhodeIslandWells.html
1)Russell-b.~1780, Hopkinton-Oct 7 1859, 79 yrs. White. Mar. farmer. s/o Randall & Lois Wells. HO 1:5
Russell Wells-Mar: Lydia (nee?):~1782, Waterford, CT.-May 8 1865, 83 yrs. near Ashaway, RI. White, widow. Pars: unk. Old age HO 1:12

___________________________________________

From: Hopkinton Probate Book #10, Pages 136-140   (An “X” or “x” is in place of a letter or word I was unable to make out from the original writing)

 Estate of Russell Well (deceased)

At the Court of Probate of the Town of Hopkinton on this 28th day of November A.D. 1859

Jonathan R Wells of Hopkinton one of the heirs of the estate of Russel Well late of said Hopkinton deceased, presents his petition in writing, praying that letters of administration on estate of said deceased may be granted to him or some suitable person. 

The XXX XX XXX and it is ordered that the consideration there of be referee to the 10th day of January A.D. 1860 at 9 o’clock in the forenoon at the house of John W. XXX in said Hopkinton and that the Clerk XXX notice to be given to all persons interested XX XXXX a copy of this decree in a conspicuous place in his office and another copy XX the XX of XX Noyes in said town of Hopkinton for fourteen days before XX 10th day of January.

Henry Whipple   Probate Clerk

At the Court of Probate of the town of Hopkinton on this 10th day of January AD 1860

The petition in writing of Jonathan R. Wells of Hopkinton one of the heirs of the estate of Russell Wells late of said Hopkinton deceased, XXX that he may be appointed administrator on the estate of said deceased which was on the 28th day of November last presented to the court and then referred to this time with an order of notice thereon is again taken up and it appearing that notice has been given XXXXment to said order, said petition XX XX and no person appearing to object.  Upon consideration thereof it is ordered Adjudged and Decreed that the XX of said petition be granted and that said Jonathan R. Wells be and his is hereby appointed administrator of the estate of said Russel Wells.  Said Jonathan R. Wells before entering upon said trust is ordered and required to give bond in the sum of two thousand

 Page 137

 Estate of Russel Wells (deceased) continued

Dollars ($2000) with Thomas R. Wells and Oliver B. Irish as XX in the form  XX XX by law.  (Bond given)

Henry Whipple   Probate Clerk

Copy of Letter of Administration

The State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations

Washington Se.

By the Court of Probate of the Town of Hopkinton, in the County of Washington in the State aforesaid

(SEAL)  To Jonathan R. Wells of Hopkinton in the County and State aforesaid.  Greeting

You have been appointed by this Court Administrator  on the real and personal estate of Russel Wells late of said Hopkinton deceased intestate and having given bond as the law directly, are hereby authorized and empowered to receive, recover and take possession of the Estate which to the said Russel Wells at the time of his death did assertain and belong. And the same fully to administer according to law.

In testimony where of we have caused the seal of said Court to be hereunto affixed this tenth day of January in the year of our Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and Sixty (1860)

Signed and Sealed by order and in behalf of said Court

Henry Whipple   Probate Clerk

 The foregoing is a true copy of the original letter of Administration

 Witness:                                                      Henry Whipple   Probate Clerk

 Page 138

 Estate of Russel Wells (deceased) continued

At the Court of Probate of the town of Hopkinton on this 10th day of January AD 1860

On the application of Jonathan R. Wells administrator of the estate of Russel Wells late of said Hopkinton deceased it is ordered that George W. Taylor, Oliver B Irish and Jonathan L Spencer be and they are hereby appointed to make an inventory and first appraisment of all the goods, chattels, rights and credits which were of said Russel Wells

Henry Whipple   Probate Clerk

_________________________________

 At the Court of Probate of the town of Hopkinton on this 5th day of March AD 1860

The appraisors hereto appointed on the estate of Russel Wells late of Hopkinton deceased return and inventory and appraisment of the good and chattels, rights and credits which were of said Russel Wells and Jonathan R. Wells administrator on said estate makes oath that said inventory is a first inventory of all the goods and chattels rights and credits whish was of said Russel Wells which have come to his knowledge:  Where upon said inventory and appraisement are received and it is ordered that the same be XXX

Henry Whipple   Probate Clerk

_________________________________

 Copy of Warrant to appraisers and Inventory

The State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations

Washington Se. – By the Court of Probate of the Town of Hopkinton in the county of Washington and State aforesaid XXX Probate jurisdiction.

(SEAL) To George W. Taylor, Oliver B Irish and Jonathan L. Spencer all of said Hopkinton

Greeting,

You are hereby appointed and empowered as three suitable persons, to take an inventory of

 Page 139

 Estate of Russel Wells (deceased) continued

all the goods, chattels, rights and credits where of Russel Wells late of said town of Hopkinton, deceased, did seised and possessed; and accounting to your best shill and judgment truly and justly to appraise the same as soon as may be in dollars and cents accounting to the present balance thereof, being first sworn on affirmed to the faithful discharge of that trust; and when you shall have completed said inventory as aforesaid, you are to return the same together with this warrant with you XXX  XXX to the office of the Clerk of said Court on to seal up and deliver the same to Jonathan R. Wells Administrator on the estate of the said deceased who is hereby accordingly directed so to return and exhibit the same on oath, to said Court of Probate of the Town of Hopkinton within three months from the time of taking upon himself that trust. 

In testimony Whereof XX have caused the seal of said court to be hereto affixed this tenth day of January A.D. 1860

Signed and sealed by order and in behalf of said court

Henry Whipple   Probate Clerk

Washington Sc. In Hopkinton Feb 29th  AD 1860.

Then the above names George W. Taylor, Oliver B. Irish and Jonathan L. Spencer personally appeared and made oath that they would faithfully and impartially discharge the trust XX in them by the forgoing Warrant.

Before me, Isaac Crandall Public Notary

 Washington Sc. In Hopkinton on this 5th day of March AD 1860 in presence of the written warrant who have taken an inventory and made a first appraisment of all the goods and chattels, rights and credits which were of Russel Wells, late of Hopkinton, deceased which inventory and apprasement is as follows

(see next page)

 Page 140

 Estate of Russel Wells (deceased) continued

 6 Comforters + bed quilts                                                   4oo

3 Bedsteads                                                                                7.5

6 Chairs                                                                                       120

3 Rockers                                                                                    100

1 Fell leaf Table + oil cloth                                                  50

1 Desk                                                                                          100

8 Books                                                                                       48

Lot coockery + glass vase in cupboard                        150

6 pair Sheets + Pillow cases                                               300

2 Goose feather Beds                                                           600

1 Looking Glass                                                                        25

2 Rag Carpets one on floor                                                500

1 Log chain                                                                              200

Curtains                                                                                    100

½ Doz large ½ Doz small spoons                                  100

3 Stone jars                                                                             100

1 Warming pan                                                                        25

  Knives + Forks                                                                       25

                                                                                                ______

                                                                                                $30.18

GW Taylor           

OB Irish                                 Appriasors Fees – 75.        

JL Spencer

Has not but believe

This to be a just appraisement

 The forgoing is a true copy of the original Warrant and Inventory

Witness:                                                      Henry Whipple   Probate Clerk

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May 30, 2010 – Brock Cemetery in Grafton, NY May 30, 2010

So todays CEMETERY OF THE DAY is … The Brock Cemetery, Grafton, NY.  Located on Brock Road, just east of Red Pond Road (Rt 87) in Grafton, NY.  I can’t see that it is clearly visible from the street.  You may have to get out and walk back into the woods a little to find it.

Wells, Elisha Sr.(Sep 19, 1758 – Feb 15, 1818)1st Cousin 5Xs Removed     (Elisha’s parents, Matthew Wells Sr. and Bridget Burdick are buried in the Wells Cemetery in  DeRuyter, NY.)

Wells, Abigail Wilcox   (May 19, 1785 – Apr 21, 1840)w/o Elisha Wells.  Her grave reads “___ on a glorious grave…      Shall these wite (?) bodies shine …       And every shape and every face …       Look heavenly and divine”

Hall, Dorcas Wells Peckham(Dec 7, 1799/98 – Apr 4, 1870)2nd Cousin 4Xs Removed (Dorcas is the daughter of Elisha Wells Sr. and Abigail Wilcox above)

Peckham, Braddock Jr.  (Jan 4, 1781 – Jan 7, 1834)h/o Dorcas Wells

Peckham, Celamith(Abt 1811 – 1839)3rd Cousin 3Xs Removed (Celamith is the son of Dorcas Wells and Braddock Peckham Jr.) (Dorcas, Braddock & Celamith were moved here from another cemetery.)

Here is a map to the cemetery and a list of those buried there that I was able to get from the kind folks at the local historical society:Map of Grafton Cemetery locations[1]

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May 27, 2010 Jonathan Wells House May 27, 2010

Today I thought I’d get back to the Wells Family and talk about the Jonathan Wells House located at 178 Diamond Hill Road in Ashaway, RI. 

The Jonathan Wells house (aka The Jonathan Wells – Ethnathan Babcock House) is a post and beam 2 story house with center chimney and sits on 3.9 acres of land overlooking the Tomaquag Valley.  It has 3 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms and six working fireplaces, one with a working beehive oven and a smoke house in the attic.    Behind the house is a detached 2 car garage with a hay loft and a small barn.  A Late Victorian, wood-shingled barn is nearby.   I have seen it written many times that “Originally the house was part of the Jonathan Wells estate”.  I’ve never actually seen it written that he built he house.  Although he may have, all I can say with any degree of certainty is that he owned and was living in the house at the time of his death.

Jonathan Wells (6-22-1712 to 3-5-1772) has the distinction of being my 5th Great Grand Uncle and my 1st Cousin 5 times removed at the same time.  Jonathan is the son of my 6th Great Grand Uncle, Nathaniel Wells (1672-1768/9) who was the son of my 7th Great Grandparents Thomas Wells and Naomi Marshall.  This is how he is my 1st cousin 5 times removed.   He is my 5th Great Grand Uncle because he was married to Elizabeth Maxson, who was the daughter of my 6th Great Grandparents the Rev. Joseph Maxson and Tacy Burdick.

The house has been called the Jonathan Wells-Ethnathan Babcock House.  Figuring that Ethnathan Babcock was probably another owner of the house I tracked him down.  

 Jonathan Wells had a son named Elnathan Wells (born ca 1737).  

Elnathan’s will dated 2 July 1804 mentions his nephews, Elnathan Babcock and Peleg Babcock.

Elnathan Babcock and Peleg Babcock Jr. were sons of Peleg Babcock Sr. & Elizabeth Wells.

Elizabeth was the daughter of Elnathan’s brother Jonathan.

So basically Elnathan Babcock was the grandson of Elnathan Well’s brother or you could say he was his great nephew.

Jonathan’s will reads:

“To the name of God Amen this fifth day of March in the year of Our Lord 1772, I , Jonathan Wells, of Hopkinton in the County of Kings County and Colony of Rhode Island, yeoman, being in health and of perfect mind and Memory, thanks be given to God, for the same and calling to mind the mortality of my body and knowing that it is appointed for all men once to die, do make and ordain this my last will and testament that is to say Principally and first of all I give and recommend my soul into the hands of God that gave it.  And for my body I recommend it to the earth to be buried in a christian decent manner at the descretion of my executor.  Nothing doubting but at the general resurrection I shall receive the same again by the mighty Power of God and as touching such worldly____ where with it hath pleased God to bless me in this life, I give, devise and dispose of the same in manner and form following that is today…..

     Item-I give and bequeath to Rebeccah Wells, my dearly beloved wife, (NOTE: Jonathan married a second time to Rebecca Clagget after his 1st wife died) the one third of the use and profit of my real estate together with the best room and bedroom adjoining the same in my now dwelling house with the priviledge of the kitchen and buttery and cellar.  I likewise give to my said wife, two ____ and their furniture and two pots and a kittle and ice kittle and the silver teaspoons, tea tongs and silver strainer and a set of china cups and saucers and ditto of stoneware, two glass tumblers or baker glasses and teapot and her choice of the looking glass and six chairs and tea table and warming pan and two china bowls.

     I likewise give to my wife, firetongs and _____ and the case of drawers and trunk and great chair and three basons, six spoons of puter, six plates and two platters and one tub and one pole and trammel and frying pan and three knives and forks, one large silver spoon, all the above articles I give to my said wife during the time she remains as my widow.  But if she marry, it is my will that she shall have no more than one good bed and furniture and eight dollars worth of the rest of the household stuffs as she wishes to have which shall be her estate forever at her disposal. 

     Item-I give and bequeath unto my beloved sons, Elnathan Wells and Jonathan Wells all my real estate and all the rest of my personal that I have not already given away by this will after my last debts and funeral monies being first paid.  I give to my sons equally to be divided between them, my two farms to be divided by a northerly and southerly line ______ to quantity and quality and my said sons after dividing said farms shall come to for their choice of said land.  All said land I give to my sons and their heirs and assigns forever. 

     And I do hereby constitute, ordain and appoint my aforesaid son, Elnathan Wells, my only sole executor of this my last will and testament.  I do hereby disallow, revoke and disannul all and every other former testaments, wills and legacies, bequeaths and executors by me in any way before this time named, willed and bequeathed.  Ratifying and confirming this as no other to be my last will and testament.

     In witness thereof, I have here unto set my hand and seal the day and year before written.

     Signed, sealed, published, pronounced by the Jonathan Wells as his last will and testament.

     In presence of us the subscribers.                                Jonathan Wells   (seal)

Witnesses:         Ethan Clarke,  Daniel Clarke,  Joshua Clarke                                                                        

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The Jonathan Wells house was “raffled” off last fall.  Here’s an article on it: And here’s a link to another article on line: http://www.thewesterlysun.com/news/article_188e3b80-e6db-11de-8640-001cc4c03286.html  I have a friend who works for the town there that said that some state officials found out about the raffle after it occurred and had said  kind of raffle was not legal in the state of Rhode Island.  I haven’t heard anything since then.  If you know what the current status of the house is, let me know.

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May 24, 2010 – John Rogers and his Mid-Night Cry May 24, 2010

About a year ago, I was trolling around on EBAY and entered in “John Rogers” into a search and low and behold someone was selling the book A Mid-Night-Cry from the Temple of God by John Rogers Sr of Mamacock Farm.  I was amazed as it’s a pretty rare book and I’d have loved to have bid on it but they were asking an opening bid of like $250 and that was a little out of my budget.  However, I saved the pictures from the EBAY listing and here they are:

 

 

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May 23, 2010 – Randall’s Ordinary May 23, 2010

Yesterday I actually got around to sorting through a bunch of loose genealogy papers that had been loitering around since my move.  I found a few items that needed to be scanned and here are a sampling of them.

First is an advertisement I found while looking through an old travel magazine for New London Co.  An advert for Randall’s Ordinary Restaurant.  AKA site of the Randall Cemetery.  See the first few days of this blog for more on that cemetery, when it was the cemetery of the day.

Next is a few random items of William R Wells (my great grandfather) of Ashaway, RI in connection to the Mill he managed.

Here are a few articles I found in connection to the old Crandall Homestead in Westerly, RI.

Here are a few items that are about William R Wells (Same as above) and his poultry business. The article that doesn’t say where it comes from is the one that goes with the Poultry Advocate.

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May 21, 2010 – James Rogers and Winthrop’s Mill May 21, 2010

Today I am still working on the Rogers family from James Sr through the children of John Rogers Jr.  I recently discovered the will of James Rogers Sr. (1615-1687) in two different sources.  One was the book Signers of the Mayflower Compact by Annie Arnoux Haxton (available on google books) and the other source was a website :

http://rogersfam.net/rogersfam/history/william1/james1a.htm  The book and the site had basically the same will except that the website looks to have had the original english.  wt for what, ye and all that other old english that can be a little difficult to make out at times (at least to me.)  So here is the will of James Rogers.  It’s the one off the site but I kinda cleaned it up a little to make it easier to read.

The last will and testament of James Rogers Senior being in perfect memory and understanding; but under the hand of God by sickness. This I leave with my Wife & all my children, Sons and Daughters; I being old & knowing that ye time of my departure is at hand. What I have of this world, I leave Among you, desiring you not to fall out of content about it; but let your love one to another appear more, then to the Estate I leave with you which is but of this world. And for your comfort I signifie to you, that I have A perfect assurance; of an interest in Jesus Christ, & an Eternal happy Estate in ye world to come, and do know & see my name is written in ye book of life; & therefore mourn not for me: as they that are without hope. I commit my spirit into ye hand of God almighty, desiring that my body it may be buried (hoping for a resurrection) and what is Expended there upon let it be paid out of ye Estate I leave.

I desire that all my debts may be paid out of the Estate I leave, I know of no old debts unpaid, nor any great matter of Debts that I owe. My land at Mystic I bequeath to my three Eldest sons Samuel Joseph and John: it being first (by them) Equally divided into three parts & then let it be divided to them by lot that Each one may know which his part is: for as ye lot falls so shall Each ones part be.  They paying to my daughter Elizabeth twenty pounds.

To my son James I bequeath, Gothon (GOSHEN) neck & that he shall have a high way to it, over the pond where I now go.

To my son Jonathon my Housing: & so (HOUSE AND LANDS) far as Magunck (MAGUNK)fence which lies within my field fence; & the bounds between my son James & son Jonathon that is to say between Gothon (GOSHEN) and my field: shall be ye great Rock which lies between the pond and the sea, on the north side of the beach, A line being run north & south from the said Rock shall be the bounds between them.

To my son Jonathon I bequeath twenty acres in the new pasture; Joining to his house & running on the north (SOMC says South) side of my field fence; & bounded on the East with the lane running between the head of my son James his home lot & my son Jonathon his now dwelling house.

To my son James & son Jonathon I bequeath all the rest of my land lying in the new pasture as also all the rest of my land lying in the General neck: it being divided by them into two parts first & then as the lot comes forth shall Each know which his part is, (And my will is that my son James pay to my daughter Elizabeth twenty pounds within a year after the death of his mother, my wife) And that my son Jonathon pay to my daughter Elizabeth fifty pounds within three years after the death of my Wife ten of it the first year: after her death.

(SOTMC has this here: To my son Joseph, I bequeath the land I had of Obadiah Bowen, called Bruin’s Neck.)

To my son Joseph (SOTMC says John, not Joseph) I leave the land that I had of Robert Allyn lying on the East side of the River that goeth to Norwich, he paying to his sister, my Daughter Bathsheba the sum of twenty pounds: within a year after the death of my wife & if he sees cause not to do so, my Daughter Bathsheba shall have the said land.

And all ye rest of my Estate, as cattle, household goods Debts & parsonable Estate I leave with my wife to dispose of as she sees good: only to pay to my daughter Elizabeth ten pounds if she sees good with ye advice of my son John: I also give liberty to my Wife to sell or dispose of any part of my land or Estate here willed if she sees cause so todo, without offence to any of my Children: & to have the use of my housing during her life time to live in or let out.

Some Cattle was left with me by my son John to use as my own not giving me power to give or will away but did promise me that what I sold or killed for the family’s use he would never demand pay for, but only those that should be remaining in my hand.

The Chamber where my son John now lives I leave with him with the Room under it for him to live in during his life time: if my wife sees cause not to order it other wise.

If any difference should arise about my land here willed or Any part of my Estate for want of a plain discovery whether about bounds or other wise, my will is that there shall be no lawing amung my children before Earthly judges but that ye Controversies be ended by lot & so I refer the Judgment to God: & as the lot comes forth so shall it be:

And this I declare to be my last will & testament as witnesses my hand this Eleventh day of ye ninth month one thousand six hundred eighty & three

Witnesses———-Sam Beebe. Snor———–Mary Beebe

Inventory

one copper kettle 30s. one brass kettle 10s.____________2:–:–

one iron kettle and 3 iron pots one of them broken______-:-4:-3

small pewter platters 3 basons 3 plates_______________1:–:–

one feather bed and furniture_______________________5:–:–

one other bed and bedding and bed stead______________1:10:–

chest and chaires and wooden are____________________-:15:–

husbandy utensils a axs two chaines one pair of plow irons__

iron crow three hoes cart and wheels a barrow and scythes__2:10:–

the house and barn_______________________________40:–:–

an indian servant and his wife a negro woman having about__

3 years served valued at___________________________8:–:–

Adam a malotta servat about 3 years to serve__________5:–:–

A negro woman deaf and dumb_____________________2:–:–

one ox and six cows at____________________________15:–:–

2 steers 3 years old at_____________________________4:–:–

2 heifers at two years old and vantage________________3:–:–

2 heifers and one bull year old at vantage_____________3:–:–

Six cattle one year old in the spring__________________3:–:–

one horse and one mare___________________________4:10:10

44 sheep old and young___________________________11:–:–

2 sows and nine shoars____________________________3:15:–

40 bushels of indian corn by estimation_______________3:–:–

10 bushels of pease 8 bushels of meslin 5 bushels barley__3:–:–

3 barrels of beef & one barrel of pork________________6:–:–

30 acres of Land on the East side of the river__________8:–:–

40 rodd of land by a tan yard included in ye other land___

2 P of pothangers a grindstone and still yards__________-:10:–

one horse and one cow____________________________4:10:–

one barrel of molasses one firkin of butter_____________2:10:–

one large platter and wearing apparel_________________2:-5:–

20 yards of Kersey Coverlids & blankets______________3:–:–

a warming pan 2 spits s bibles & a bedspread___________1:–:–

3 stacks of hay a barrel of musket____________________3:–:–

This inventory taken the 15th of feb 1681 by Edward Palmer & Daniel Wetherel, townsmen

Letters of Administration Granted to Samll Rogers on the Estate of his father James Rogers deceased.

Sir Edmund Andros Knt Capt Generall and Governr in Chief of his majesties Territory and Dominion of New England to Samuell Rogers of New London in the County of New London Baker Eldest Son of James Rogers of the same place yeoman Deceased Whereas the said James Rogers having while he lived and at the time of his Death goods rights and creditts in divers places within this Dominion now lately Dyed Intestate by Vertue whereof the power of Administration and full Disposition of all and Singular the goods rights and Creditts of the said Deceased And also the hearing Examination and allowing the accounts of the administration of the same apputains unto me I Being Desirious that the goods rights and creditts of the said Deceased should be well and faithfully administered Doe therefore Trusting in your fidelity by virtue of these presents Committ unto you full power to administer the goods rihts and Creditts of the said deceased and well and faithfully to Dispose of the same And also to ask gather Leavye and require whatsoever Creditts of the said Deceased which to him while he lived and at the time of his death did appurtaine And to pay all Debts in which the said Deceased at the time of his Death stood bound as far as his goods rights and Creditts can extend akording to the Value thereof And to make a full and exsact Inventory of all and Singular the goods rights and Credits of the said Deceased and to Exhibit the same unto the Secretaries Office at Boston the Second Day of September next ensueing And also to render a playne and true account of yr Aministration upon Oath The Second Day of March which shall be in the yeare of Our Lord One Thousand Six Hundred Eighty & Eight And I doe by these presents Ordaine Depute & Constitue you Administrator of all & Singular the goods rights and credits aforesd Probate of Wills & Granting administration. Dated the first day of March One thousand six hundred eighty and seven.

____________

So today I was also trolling around on EBAY looking for a few genealogy books I’ve been looking for and came across a ton of postcards of the Old Winthrop Mill inNew London, CT.  This is the mill that James first worked at when he came to New London.  Here is the collection of pictures I got off of EBAY.

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May 19, 2010 – Mamacock Farm & the Rogers Family May 20, 2010

So I spent time today going over all the data I’ve collected over the past few days on the movements of the Rogers Family.  I’ll post my findings when I’m done. 

An interesting thought occurred to me last night.  I was thinking about what life was like on Mamacock Farm when John Rogers Sr and Jr were living there together right before John Sr. went off to Boston and got Small Pox.  Living in the house was John Sr. and John Jr.  Now remember that Jr. was raised by his mother Elizabeth Griswold who had “Divorced” John Sr.  Also in the house was John Jr’s wife Bathsheba Smith.  Bathsheba, besides being John Sr. daughter in law, was also his niece!  She was the daughter of his sister Bathsheba Rogers and Richard Smith.  John Sr also had his other children Mary and Gerson living there.  They were his children by Mary Ransford.  Also there was John Sr’s third wife Sarah Cole.  Wife to John, but mother of none of his children.    People today talk about how families are not the same as they used to be.  Mom, Dad and 3.5 kids in the house.   Guess they didn’t live next door to the Rogers!

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May 18, 2010 – The Rogerenes May 18, 2010

Continuing from yesterday…..  From the Book.. The Rogerenes…

On page 231 it says: “1712. Under date of March 7th of this year, we find a deed of gift 2 of some land (adjoining Mamacock farm) from John, Sr., to John, Jr., with the statement therein that this gift is to make up to his son for the land that had been taken from the latter for a fine of £20 imposed upon himself (Part I., Chapter V.), also for a choice cow and a considerable number of sheep that had been taken from his son to satisfy like claims against himself.  

He states that this gift is also to stand as a testimony of his appreciation of the fact that this son who

“was taken from me in his infancy, upon the account of my differing in judgment, and ordered by the Authority to be brought up in their principles, incensing him against me his own father, and thus kept from me till he came to a young man’s estate; yet, notwithstanding, last winter now past, hath been an instrument in the hands of God, to preserve my life in an unfinished prison, with an open window facing towards the northwest, I being fined and imprisoned by two several courts with. out any trial of law by a jury.”  It will be remembered that John Rogers is still in prison, awaiting the sitting of the March session of the Superior Court”

On pages 235-236 it says : (1712) ” Two days after, the sheriff is instructed that, after adjournment of the court, he is to convey John Rogers to the Hartford prison and see that he is shut up in a dark room, where a certain French doctor will “shave his head and give him purges,” to cure him of his madness. Such treatment, added to all the memories of past wrongs, would seem enough to give the sanest man the temporary appearance of a maniac. The more he can be made to appear like a maniac, the more plausible will be the excuse for consigning him to a worse than prison cell.  Had it remained for Gurdon Saltonstall to carry out this inhuman purpose, the statement that John Rogers died in Hartford prison, or in a madhouse, would probably have ended this man’s history.  Some person, to whom the sheriff confided the inhuman plot, being friendly to the prisoner, John Rogers is informed of the doom prepared for him. He goes directly to the sheriff, to inquire into the truth of the statement, and asks to see the warrant for this new procedure, which the sheriff shows him. He there recognizes the handwriting of Gurdon Saltonstall.  Few men could be readier in resources than the man in custody. A person is quickly found to carry word, this very (Saturday) evening, to John Rogers, Jr., at Mamacock, of the impending peril. The hurried message quite suffices: With all possible speed, before the night is far advanced, John, Jr., is at hand, with a staunch boat, near by, well manned, to convey his father to Long Island. He has also money for his use, and, finding him in need of a suitable shirt, takes off his own and gives him. The boat was easily moored not far from the prison, which is by the Mill Cove, and also not far from the Thames River, into which the cove leads.  This boat, propelled by hands well skilled, pulls out from shore, in cover of the night, and goes to brave the winds and waves of March across Long Island Sound. John, Jr., returns to Mamacock, with thrilling tale of this, so far, successful rescue. Many a follower besides John Bolles anxiously awaits the tidings. Eagerly, no doubt, they gather in the big front room at the Mamacock “mansion house,” to talk the matter over and speculate regarding the result, noting the weather betimes and praying for a bon voyage.  Before dawn, John Rogers is landed at Southold, and makes his way to the tavern.”

On Page 241 it says: 1714.  Mary, the second wife of John Rogers, was, a number of years since, married to Robert Jones of Block Island.l It is now fifteen years since John Rogers took her for his wife and twelve years since their enforced separation. He has recently become attached to an estimable widow, by the name of Sarah Cole, of Oyster Bay, L.I., a member of the Quaker Society of that locality. Although favorable to his suit, she is yet inclined to hesitate, on account of rumors that have been circulated in regard to his separation from Mary. In his prompt, straightforward way, he desires her to accompany him to Block Island, to learn from Mary herself if she has anything to say against him. This request is so reassuring, that the publication of their marriage intentions takes place at New London, July 4, 1714 (“Hempstead Diary”), after which they visit Mary at her home on Block Island. Mary gives Mrs. Cole so favorable an account of John Rogers and the treatment she herself received from him, that the ceremony is performed by Justice Wright before they leave the island.
[There is evidence, from the court records and testimony of Peter Pratt,2 that this wife, Sarah, was of attractive personality, also that she was a zealous religious co-worker with her husband, and that they lived happily together at Mamacock, with John, Jr ., and his family and the two children of Mary.]“

On Page  262-3: (1721) “Fast and far is spread the alarm that John Rogers, just returned from his foolhardy visit to Boston, is prostrated at Mamacock with the dread contagion. There are in the house, including himself, thirteen persons. Adding the servants who live in separate houses on the place, it is easy to swell the number to “upwards of twenty.” The large farm, spreading upon both sides of the road, is itself a place of isolation. On the east is a broad river, separating it from the uninhabited Groton bank. On the north is wooded, uninhabited, Scotch Cap.1 There is possibly a dwelling within half a mile at the northwest. A half-mile to the south is the house of John Bolles. What few other neighbors there may be, are well removed, and there are dwellings enough on the farm to shelter all not required for nursing the sick. To what degree the family might take the usual precautions, if left to themselves, or how efficacious might be their scriptural methods, can never be known; since the authorities take the matter in hand at the start.

Had this illness occurred in the very heart of a crowded city, greater alarm or more stringent measures could not have ensued. There is a special meeting of Governor and Council at New Haven, October 14, on receipt of the news that John Rogers is ill at Mamacock with the smallpox, and that “on account of the size of the family, upwards of twenty persons, and the great danger of many persons going thither and other managements ” (doubtless referring to scriptural methods of restoration and precaution) “there is great liability of the spread of the infection in that neighborhood.” It is enacted that “effectual care be taken to prevent any intercourse between members of the family and other persons, also that three or four persons be impressed to care for the sick.” ……… ” Three days after the official order that every relative and friend be banished from his bedside, and so with no one near him but the immunes pressed into the service, John Rogers yields up his life unto Him whom he has faithfully striven to obey, fearing not what man or any earthly chance might do to him. Thus dies John, the beloved and trusted son of James Rogers, and the last of that family.” ……. “

The day after this death, at another special meeting of Governor and Council, it is enacted that “constant watch be kept about the house, to seize and imprison all persons who may attempt to hold any intercourse with the quarantined family.” Little do those who have been forced to take charge at Mamacock and to punish all friendly “intruders about the premises” appreciate the deep sorrow and sympathy of these long-time neighbors and friends, who desire to hear the particulars, to show respect for the departed and to render aid to the family. Rudely rebuked, no doubt, are the most reasonable efforts on the part of these friends, to prove their love and fellowship in grief, although as yet no one else has the contagion and all thoughts are centred on this one great bereavement.

When shortly Bathsheba, wife of John Rogers (now 2d) and their eldest son, John, are stricken, the dark shadows deepen over Mamacock, and friends of the family would fain show some sign of fearless fidelity, not only to those afflicted, but to the teachings of the New Testament and the Old, in regard to the power and good will of God to hold even the direst pestilence in His hand. Much of the endeavor on the part of these friends appears to be to provide the family with such necessaries for their comfort as have not yet been supplied by the authorities.”

On page 265 it says:  “Two more of the family die of the disease, Bathsheba, wife of John Rogers, 2d, and John, their son. When all is over, John Rogers, 2d, is called upon to pay the expenses of official nurses, guards, provisions and medicines, a large bill, on which he is allowed no reduction.

John Rogers having died intestate, his son John is appointed administrator. The only heirs allowed by the court are the widow, John Rogers, 2d, and Elizabeth Prentice, “only son” and “only daughter,” among whom the estate is divided by due course of law. When this form is ended, John Rogers, 2d, ignoring the fact that he, as only son under the law, has “a double portion,” and Gershom and Mary, the two children by Mary, are awarded nothing of this estate, pays to each of these a liberal sum out of his own portion for “share in” their “father’s estate” (as is still to be seen on the town records). Well may Mary, if living, forgive this honorable man for some things that displeased her in the past. He claims her children as his father’s before the world; he claims them as brother and sister of his own. He afterwards buys of them land at Mamacock, which was given them by their father, Gershom’s land “having a house thereon.”

On page 266 it says: “Mamacock farm has been much enlarged since, by that name; it was the old Blinman farm, and as such given to Elizabeth Griswold; it has taken in lands to the north, south and west (across the Norwich road). In a southeast corner of its present (1721) boundaries, close by the river bank, are three graves that mark the earthly loss to family and friends of that fearless visit to Boston. The sentiments of the Rogerenes who view those mounds are: “The Lord hath given and the Lord hath taken away, blessed be the name of the Lord.”

On page 277 it says: “About 1740, Capt. Benjamin Greene, of Rhode Island a younger brother of Gov. William Greene established a home farm near Mamacock, at the point caned “Scotch Cap.”

On page 279 it says:  “In June, 1753, occurs the death of John Rogers, 2d, in his eightieth year. He has made a long and heroic stand, since at the age of seventeen years he joined his father in this contest. To him is largely due the size and strength of a sect that has called for the bravest of the brave and found them. Fifteen children gather at Mamacock, to follow the remains of this honored and beloved father to the grave, eight sons and seven daughters, of the average age of thirty-four years, the eldest (son) being fifty-two and the youngest (son) fourteen years of age. Besides these, with their families, and the widow in her prime, is the large gathering of Bolleses and other friends and followers in the locality, also those of Groton and doubtless many from other places.

They lay the form of this patriarch beside his father, his wife Bathsheba and the children gone before, in the ground he has set apart, in the southeast corner of his farm, as a perpetual burial place for his descendants, close by the beautiful river that washes Mamacock. They mark his grave, like the others in this new ground, by two rough stones, from nature’s wealth of granite in this locality, whose only tracery shall be the lichen’s mossy green or tender mould.1

1 The early graves still discernible in this old family burying-ground are marked by natural, uninscribed stones, which was the ordinary mode before grave-stones came into common use in New England. In family burying-places, on farms or in out-of-the-way places, the lack of inscriptions continued to a comparatively late period. Many such old family burying-places have been long obliterated. The preservation of this one is probably due to its being secured by deed. (See New London Record, November 13, 1751.) It is said that, despite the lack of inscriptions, descendants in the earlier part of the nineteenth century could tell who was buried in each of the old graves. The railroad has cut off a portion of this burial ground, which originally extended to the verge of the river. Tradition states that some of the graves on the river bank were washed away at the time of the great September gale (1813).

On page 280-281 it says: “John Rogers, 2d, was a man of remarkable thrift and enterprise as well as of high moral and religious character.1 His inventory is the largest of his time in New London and vicinity, and double that of many accounted rich, consisting mainly of a number of valuable farms on both sides of the Norwich road, including the enlarged Mamacock farm, the central part of which (Mamacock proper), his home farm, is shown by the inventory to be under a high state of cultivation and richly stocked with horses, cattle and sheep. His children had received liberal gifts from him in his lifetime.

Four of the eight sons of John Rogers, 2d, are now in the prime of life, and not only landed proprietors but men of excellent business ability. John, the youngest of the four, now in his thirtieth year, is appointed administrator of his father’s estate and guardian of his two minor brothers. James, the eldest, is a very enterprising business man. That his coopering establishment is a large plant is shown by the fact that he is, immediately after the death of his father, the richest man in New London, his estate being nearly equal to that left by his father.2 The preamble of his will proved in 1754, shows him to have been a Christian of no ordinary stamp. Thus soon, after the death of John Rogers,2d, this worthy and capable son, who must have been a man of large influence in the Society, is removed. For some time previous to his death, he occupied, as a home farm, the southern third of the enlarged Mamacock 1 which fell to him later by his father’s will upon which was a “mansion house” said to have been built of materials brought from Europe. His brother Samuel has inherited the northern third of the enlarged Mamacock, upon which he resided for some time previous to the death of his father. His brother John has inherited the central part, or Mamacock proper, which his father reserved for his own use.

 There are numerous allusions to John Rogers, 2d, in the “Hempstead Diary,” but a number of references to “John Rogers,” which in the published Diary are credited to John, 2d, refer to his cousin, Capt. John Rogers, of Great Neck vicinity, as does the statement under October 4, 1735, that John Rogers “girdled the apple trees” on the “Crossman lot.” This “Crossman lot,” on the Great Neck, by “Lower Mamacock,” was in litigation between Capt. John Rogers and Mr. Hempstead, for some time, and was finally accorded to Mr. Hempstead. “Lower Mamacock” by “lower Alewife Cove,” is easily confounded with “Upper Mamacock,” by “upper Alewife Cove,” although they are six or seven miles apart.

2 This coopering establishment was located on Main Street, by the Mill Cove, on land which had been given him by his father in 1725 (New London Record); it bordered the Mill Cove and there was a wharf belonging to it. Tradition has confounded this James with his son James, the only son of the former who reached middle life. James, Jr., was remembered by some of the older people of the middle of the nineteenth century and familiarly called “Jimmy Rogers.” He succeeded to the business of his father, by the Mill Cove, and continued it on a still larger scale, packing beef of his own preparation, in barrels of his own manufacture, and shipping it to southern markets. He was a very successful business man; but the piety conspicuous in the character of his father is not ascribable to this James, who appears not to have made any profession of the Christian faith. He was a young man at the time of the persecution of the Society to which his father belonged, which was instituted by the denomination of which his mother was a member, and which resulted in the blood-curdling scenes attendant upon the countermove of 1764-6. Such scenes enacted by professing Christians, in vengeful punishment of other professing Christians, were calculated to make anything but a religious impression upon a youth of the strictly practical turn of mind that is ascribed to this James.

1 The farm (Speaking of Mamaock) now (1904) occupied by Mr. Henry Benham is a portion of what was the James Rogers farm. A southern portion of the latter was sold by heirs of James, Jr., to the Lewis brothers. The farm inherited by Samuel Rogers is now owned by Mr. Stephen Comstock. Mamacock proper, left to John Rogers, 3d, is the farm now owned by Mr. Fitzgerald, including Mamacock peninsula. Each of these farms had, originally, pasture and woodland on the west side of the Norwich road.

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From: The antecedents and descendants of Noah Whipple: of the Rogerene community … By Clara Hammond McGuigan, Page 14…. of John Rogers “He was mater of a plantation called mamacock Farm which occupid several thousand acres on the western side of the Thames River near the present site of the Connecticut College for Women.”

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May 17, 2010 – Rogers Family of New London, CT May 17, 2010

So I spent some time today going through a few different sources trying to Make sense out of which members of the Rogers Family lived and or were buried at the Rogers Cemetery at Mamacock Farm.  I went through the Diary of Joshua Hempstead which mentions the farm and Rogers family quite a bit and also the book The Rogerenes (both available on google books).  I started with James Rogers (My 7th Great Grandfather. 1615-1687).  Using the books to track his movements in the New London area.  James was already a wealthy man before he came to the New London area.  Gov. Winthrop seems to have enticed him to come to the area and asked him to come run his mill.  This is the Old Winthrop Mill that is still in existence located at 8 Mill Street, New London, CT.  (Check it out on an aerial map.  The mill is below a section of 95 where the South bound lanes are above the mill on one side and the North bound lanes are above it on the other side.  You can see how they built around it.)   Here is a picture of the mill. 

 The mill is located up the creek from the opening of Winthrop Cove.  The Governor had his house on Winthrop Neck at the site of the present Winthrop Elementary School.  The Gov. sold James Rogers a piece of land close to the mill for him to build a stone house on.   James lived in this house for some time, raising his family there.  James gives this house to his some Samuel upon his marriage.  At the same time, he gives Sam the family bakery.  This is about 1662.   

So James Sr. must have seen this time coming and had back in 1660 purchased a farm 5 miles south of there at The Great Neck on Jordans Cove on the Long Island Sound and moved there in 1662 after giving the house by the mill to son Sam.    This area is in present day Waterford in the same area that the West Neck Cemetery and the Old Rogers Cemetery are in with the farm and house down in the Shore Road Area somewhere. 

James Sr. didn’t live at this farm long as he gave it to his son Joseph less than one year after moving in.  It seems to coincide with Joseph’s marriage so may have been a gift for that occasion.  He gave him the farm “and lands at Great Neck”.  …. This information I got out of The Rogerenes.  It conflicts with info I got from a book called Waterford and Independence 1776-1976.   It says that James gave a house located at 11 Magonk Point to hs son Jonathan (not Joseph).  Here is that book’s info….James Rogers House 

On page 21 of The Rogerenes it says:  “James Rogers, senior, a prosperous and esteemed business man of Milford, Conn., had dealings in New London as early as 1656, and soon after became a resident. Says Miss Caulkins: —He soon acquired property and influence and was much employed, both in civil and ecclesiastical affairs. He was six times representative to the General Court. Mr. Winthrop had encouraged his settlement in the plantation and had accommodated him with a portion of his own house lot next the mill, on which Rogers built a dwelling house of stone. He was a baker on a large scale, often furnishing biscuit for seamen and for colonial troops, and between 1660 and 1670 had a greater interest in the trade of the port than any other person in the place. His landed possessions were very extensive, consisting of several hundred acres on the Great Neck, the fine tract of land at Mohegan, called the Pamechaug Farm, several house lots in town and 2,400 acres east of the river, which he held in partnership with Col. Pyncheon of Springfield.1 Perhaps no one of the early settlers of New London numbers at the present day so great a throng of descendants. 

The Great Neck is still in midsummer beauty, with delicate touches of autumnal brightness, when the hospitable mansion of James Rogers is reopened to the friends who were here on a like 

I’m Not quite sure where James Sr. went after he left the Great Neck /Pamechaug Farm.  Still working on that one.  He may have gone to live at Mamacock Farm but I haven’t found any evidence of that yet. YET. 

So where does Mamacock Farm come in?  Well it looks like James bought Mamacock farm back when he moved to the New London Area.  He then built the stone house by the mill to be close to his business ventures but not very close as it seems to the original farm that he bought.  He must have owned it all this time but it is next mentioned as a gift from James to his son John Rogers Sr (founder of the Rogerenes) upon his marriage to Elizabeth Griswold.    If you don’t know the story of John and Elizabeth, go to The Rogerenes and read it.  Let’s just say, it doesn’t end well.   The night before their wedding John sends a letter to Elizabeth giving her his Mamacock Farm.  This letter always makes me pause for a moment.  This seems to me a gesture of true love as he had no reason to give her a farm that he was getting for his marriage.  Woman didn’t own the family farm if the husband was still living and even after he died it usually went to the male heir bypassing the widow.  He must have really loved her, which is all the more sad considering how their love story ended.  I digress. 

So John and Elizabeth marry on October 17, 1670.  But instead of bringing her back to the farm-house that was built by the previous owner of the farm Mr. Blinnman,  John builds her a new “commodious” house that is close to the Mohegan Road.  The front room of the house is 20×20 with big fireplaces in every room both below and above. 

By 1674, John Rogers Sr. still resides at Mamacock with Elizabeth but travells quite a bit to Newport and other places.  It is that this time that he has his religious awakening and starts to go against the established church. On page 127 of The Rogerenes is a great quote. “The conversion of John Rogers was directly preceded by one of those sudden and powerful convictions of sin so frequently exemplified in all ages of the Christian church, and so well agreeing with Scriptural statements regarding the new birth.”   Like I said, things didn’t end well.  Elizabeth goes on with him for a while but when her folks find out he’s broken from the church, they want none of it for their daughter.  A long arguement ensues and on page 13o it says “Even as she rides away, hope must be hers that, after the happy home is left desolate, her husband will yeild to her entreaties.  Not so with him as he sees depart the light and joy of Mamacock, aye, Mamacock itself which he has given her.  He drinks the very dregs of this cup without recoil.  He parts with wife and children and lands for His name’s sake”.  

It next says “Although his own home is deserted and he will no more go cheerily to Blackhall, there is still a place where dear faces light at his coming.  It is his father’s house.”   This says to me that he father, James Sr. was not living at Mamacock farm after he gave it to John and Elizabeth.  This was in 1674. 

So where was James Sr. living at this time?  Well it goes on to say on page 130 “At this time, the home of James Rogers is upon the Great Neck. By some business agreement, his son Joseph resigned to his father, in 1670, the lands upon this Neck which had been given him in 1666. In this year (1674), his father reconfirms to him the property bought of Obadiah Bruen, by Robin Hood’s Bay. The younger children, Jonathan and Elizabeth, are still at home with their parents. Bathsheba and her family are living near, on the Great Neck, as are also Captain James and his family.”  This may be how in the other book on Waterford it says that James gave he house in Great Neck (Waterford) to his son Jonathan. 

So what happened to Mamacock while he left it.  Well the Griswalds were trying to lay claim to it.  Elizabeth had filed for divorce on the grounds that John was a heretic.  On page 131 it says: “Although John may still lay some claim to Mamacock farm, while awaiting legal action on the part of the Griswolds, it can be no home to him in these days of bitter bereavement. Warm hearts welcome him to his father’s house, by the wide blue Sound, and here he takes up his abode. Never a man of his temperament but loved the sea and the wind, the sun and the storm, the field and the wood. All of these are here. Here, too, is his “boat,” evidently as much a part of the man as his horse. No man but has a horse for these primitive distances, and in this family will be none but the best of steeds and boats in plenty.” 

John’s troubles now start.  He is in and out of jail for his beliefs as he is very out spoken.  I’m not going to go into details of his woes as I’m trying to stay focused on where they were living and moving around.  On page 133 it says: “Although John Rogers has been a member of the Sabbatarian church but a few weeks, he is already pastor of a little church on the Great Neck (under the Newport church) of which his father, mother, brothers and sisters are devout attendants, together with servants of the family and neighbors who have become interested in the new departure. Who will preach to this little congregation, while its young pastor is in Hartford awaiting the issue of the Griswold vengeance? Of those who have received baptism, James is upon the “high seas,” in pursuance of his calling, and Jonathan is but a youth of twenty. Yet Mr. James Rogers does not permit the Seventh Day Sabbath of Christ and His disciples to pass unobserved. The little congregation gather at his house,as usual, and sit in reverent silence, as in the presence of the Lord.l Perchance the Holy Spirit will inspire some among them to speak or to pray. They are not thus gathered because this is the Quaker custom, for they are not Quakers; they are simply following a distinct command of the Master and awaiting the fulfilment of one of His promises.”  From this we can add that James Rogers Sr. was allowing them to hold “Church” in his home on the Great Neck. 

An interesting note in The Rogerenes says on page 139: The hesitation of the New London church in dealing with the Rogeres can readily be understood.  Mr. James Rogers is the prinipal taxpayer, his rates for church and ministry are largest of all, to say nothing of those of his sons.  Not only this, but the family has been one of the most respected in the town”  Always seems to come down to money doesn’t it. 

On page 139-140 (the year is 1676) it says: The Great Neck is still in midsummer beauty, with delicate touches of autumnal brightness, when the hospitable mansion of James Rogers is reopened to the friends who were here on a like mission in the chilly days of winter”   It goes on to talk of James Rogers’ baptism by his house in Great Neck. “In front of the house lies the wide, blue Sound. It is easy to picture the scene, as the earnest, gray-haired man and his wife and daughter accompany Elder Hiscox down the white slope of the beach to the emblem of cleansing that comes to meet them. No event in the past busy career of James Rogers can have seemed half so momentous as the present undertaking. There are doubtless here present not a few spectators, some of them from the church he has renounced, to whom this baptism is as novel as it is questionable; but they must confess to its solemnity and a consciousness that the rite in Christ’s day was of a similar character. Those who came to smile have surely forgotten that purpose, as the waters close over the man who has been so honorable and honored a citizen, and who, despite the ridicule and the censure, has only been seeking to obey the commands of the Master, and, through much study, pious consideration and fervent prayer, has decided upon so serious a departure from the New England practice.” 

So back to Mamacock.  On page 144 it says: “Besides the arraignment of the Rogers family at the June court, as previously described, a suit is brought by Matthew Griswold for damages to the amount of £300. A part of this sum is for the Mamacock farm, which John Rogers very naturally declined to deliver up to the marshal on demand of the divorced wife, which refusal is denominated by Mr. Griswold in this suit a “breach of covenant.”  So when all is said and done John Rogers Sr. retains Mamacock Farm from the clutches of his In-Laws. 

Back at Great Neck, it says on pave 149: In March, 1678, Jonathan is married to Naomi; he brings her to the Great Neck, to a handsome farm by the shore, provided for them by his father, close bordering the home farms of his father and brothers.2 This is an affectionate family group, despite some few differences in religious belief. It is evident enough to these logicians that He who commanded men to love even their enemies, allowed no lack of affection on the part of relatives, for any cause.”  So I’m thinking we’re talking about at least 3 houses here on the Great Neck.  James Sr. Jonathan, James Jr. and ??.  What about John Rogers Sr? Is he still living at his father’s house? 

On page 155 it says:  “1683. In this year occurs the death of Richard Smith, husband of Bathsheba. Also the will of James Rogers is written, at his dictation, by his son John. In this year James Rogers confirms to his son Joseph all his lands at “Poquoig or Robin Hood’s Bay,” within certain boundaries of fence, ledge and “dry pond.” This land appears to be a part of the gift of land returned by Joseph to his father, in 1670.” 

On page 160 it says: “1687.In December, 1687, “Elizabeth, former wife of John Rogers,” resigns her claim to Mamacock, on condition of certain payments, in instalments, signing herself, “Elizabeth, daughter of Matthew Griswold” (New London Records.)” 

On page 163 it says: (1688) “For some years previous to the date of his death, the home farm of James Rogers was upon that beautiful portion of the shore lands of the Great Neck called Goshen, and here his widow continues to reside. His son Jonathan’s place is adjoining on the south. Captain James lives in the same vicinity, and is now to have the Goshen farm lands, under the will. Although Bathsheba has a farm in this locality, received from her father, she appears to be living – with her children -at her mother’s, and her brother John is there also, with a life right in the house, under the will. Samuel Beebe resides in the same neighborhood, and Joseph at his Bruen place, near by, on Robin Hood’s Bay.” 

On page 166 it says: (1690) ” let us take a general glance at the Rogers family, and first at the enterprising and wealthy Samuel Rogers, allied by marriage to some of the most prominent Congregational church members in the colony, yet himself appearing to cultivate no intimate association with the New London church, the reason for which may well be divined. He is now making active preparations for leaving New London altogether, as soon as his son Samuel is old enough to assume control of the bakery, having chosen for his future home a large tract of land in the romantic wilds of Mohegan (New London “North Parish,” now Montville). He is a great favorite with the Mohegan chief, Owaneco, son of Uncas. The popularity of Samuel Rogers with the Indians is but one of many indications of the amiable and conciliatory character of this man. His simply standing aloof from the church against whose autocratic dictum his father and brothers judged it their duty to so strenuously rebel is characteristic of the man.On the Great Neck, Jonathan Rogers and his wife, and those of their particular persuasion, are quietly holding their meetings on Saturday, paying their Congregational church rates with regularity, ” 

On page 170, after the death of James Rogers Sr., things seem to start to fall apart at Great Neck as to the division of his lands among his family.  It says: ”  In July, 1692, there is copied upon the land records a disposition by the widow of James Rogers of certain alleged rights in her husband’s estate, viz.: such rights as would have been hers by the will had there been no codicil thereto. In this document she claims a certain thirteen acres of land on the Great Neck 1 to dispose of as she “sees fit,” also all “moveables” left by her husband, with the exception of £10 willed therefrom to her daughter Elizabeth Beebe. She states that she has already sold one-half of this thirteen acres to her son-in-law, Samuel Beebe. By this singular document, she not only completely ignores the codicil to her husband’s will (already acknowledged by herself, by the other heirs and by the probate court), but her recorded deed of trust, by which, in 1688, she placed her entire life interest in the estate in charge of John and Bathsheba, whose guardianship under the will had also, by agreement of all the children, been confirmed by the General Court. In the month previous to this singular act of the widow, the committee appointed by the court, to divide the estate according to the will, announced their division, adding “when John and Bathsheba shall pay out of the moveable estate 1 to Eliz. Beebe the sum of £10,” “if the widow so order,” the remainder of the estate, real and personal, shall “remain under the care and management of John and Bathsheba during their mother’s life for her honorable maintainance,” also that, after decease of the widow, the real estate and what shall remain of the personal estate be disposed of according to the will of the testator.”  It goes on and on about problems with the will. 

On pages 174-175 it says: “In this year, 1693, another difficulty occurs regarding the settlement of the James Rogers estate. The persons appointed to divide the land among the children according to the terms of the will have given Jonathan a farm, “with house thereon,” which was included in the lands given to Joseph by his father in 1666. Joseph (as has been shown) resigned all of this gift of land to his father in 1670, but the latter redeeded the most (or supposedly all) of it back to him in 1683. Joseph appears to have understood that this farm was included in the second deed of gift, and it is probable that his father supposed it to have been thus included, by the terms of the deed. Upon examination, however, the committee have decided that this farm remains a part of the estate of the testator, and, by the terms of the will regarding the division of the residue of land between James and Jonathan, it falls to Jonathan. Naturally, Jonathan has nothing to do but to take what is accorded to him by the decision of those to whom the division has been intrusted, who have divided it to the best of their knowledge and ability. Although Joseph is in much the same position, acquiescence in his case is far less easy. He does not find any fault with the will, but simply claims this farm as his own by the deed of gift of his father, and arbiters are appointed to decide the matter. These men appear to labor under no small difficulty in concluding to which of the two the farm should really belong, but finally decide in favor of Jonathan. Joseph is unwilling to abide by this decision, asserting that some of the evidence on the other side has not been of a fair character.1 Consequently the case is reopened, with considerable favor shown, on the part of the court, to the representations of Joseph. Jonathan’s part in the case is to present evidence in favor of his right to the property awarded to him; so that he cannot be said to have gone to law in the matter.  (This attempt of Joseph to regain a farm he had supposed to be his own, is the sole “contention regarding boundaries,” which was ascribed by Miss Caulkins to the “children.” It in no way concerns the executor, who had no part whatever in designating the boundaries or dividing the land. Joseph appears to have hesitated at first to make any move in the matter; the opening protest was made in 1692 by his wife, in regard to the deed by which her husband returned to his father (in 1670) the first gift of land.1)” 

On page 194 it says: Year 1698 “The death of Elizabeth, widow of James, has recently occurred.3 John Rogers has changed his home from the Great Neck to Mamacock farm, North Parish. His sister Bathsheba has also removed to the North Parish, to a place called Fox’s Mills, from the mills owned and carried on by her husband, Samuel Fox.” 

On page 195-196 it says: (1698) “It must be sweet to breathe again the open air of freedom, and such air as blows over Mamacock; purest breezes from river and from sea, fragrant with the breath of piney woods, of pastures filled with flowers and herbs, and of fields of new-mown hay, mingled with the wholesome odor of seaweed cast by the tide upon Mamacock shore.Not far from the house, towards the river, in a broad hollow in the greensward, bordered on the north by a wooded cliff and commanding a view of the river and craggy Mamacock peninsula, is a clear, running stream and pool of spring water. Here yet (1698) the Indians come as of old, with free leave of the owner, to eat clams, as also on Mamacock peninsula, at both of which places the powdered white shells in the soil will verify the tradition for more than two hundred years to come. In this river are fish to tempt the palate of an epicure, and trout abound in the neighboring streams. A strong-built, white-sailed boat is a part of this lovely scene, and such a boat will still be found here for many years to come. (See “Hempstead Diary” for mention of boat.) ”  Shortly after his return to Mamacock, he marries one of his servant Girls, Mary Ransford. 

On page 200 it says: ” 1700.By some agreement the house at Mamacock, cattle on the place, and other farm property, are under the joint ownership of John, Sr., and John, Jr.; the one has as much right to the house and the farm stock as the other. It now appears that the junior partner has himself been intending to furnish a mistress for the house at Mamacock. In January, 1700, seven months after the marriage of his father, he brings home his bride and is forced to place her in the awkward position of one of two mistresses. The young woman who now enters upon this highly romantic and gravely dramatic scene is one with whom John Rogers, Sr., can find no fault, being none other than his niece, Bathsheba, daughter of his faithful and beloved sister of the same name.    In spite of the difficulties sure to ensue, John, Sr., cannot but welcome this favorite niece to Mamacock. Not so with Mary. Whatever estimable and attractive qualities the latter may possess, here is a situation calculated to prove whether or not she is capable of the amount of passion and jealousy that has so often transformed a usually sensible and agreeable woman into the semblance of a Jezebel. The birth of a son to Mary, at this trying period, does not better the situation. Even so courageous a man as John Rogers might well stand appalled at the probable consequences of this venturesome marriage. When he brought Mary home and directed his servants to obey her as their mistress,l he in no wise calculated upon her being thus, even partially, set aside. He stands manfully by her, as best he may, though with the evident intention that she shall refrain from any abuse of his son’s rights in the case. ” 

Suffice it to say, John Rogers Sr was unlucky in love again.  He had problems with the legitimacy of his marriage to Mary as he had never really gotten an official divorce decree from Elizabeth.  Never mind that Elizabeth had remarried.  Mary was arrested and recanted her marriage in the end and under pressure from the courts said that she had been living in sin with John and their children were illegitimate.  On page 205 it says: (1703) “The court takes no notice of this appeal. Mary is returned to Block Island and the children to Mamacock. Proof will appear, however, that she is not forgotten nor neglected. Even after her marriage to another man, and years after this hopeless separation, she will say nothing but good of him who first called her his wife and acted faithfully towards her a husband’s part.” 

On page 207 it says: (1703) “During the respite from graver cares, John Rogers has enough to busy him at Mamacock, outside of his duties as preacher and pastor, in caring for the place (in unison with John, Jr.) and other business interests, making shoes, writing books, and attending to the welfare and training of his two little children, to whom he must be both father and mother. John and Bathsheba have a third child now. So here are five little ones in the home at Mamacock. And there is Mary at Block Island. She came from across the sea, and is likely to have only the one friend in America.” 

On page 209 -210 it says: (1705) “At this time, as for some five years previous, a youth by the name of Peter Pratt is a frequent inmate of the family at Mamacock. This is none other than the son of Elizabeth Griswold by her second husband. Elizabeth could not keep her son John from fellowship with his father, and it appears that she cannot keep from the same fellowship her son by Peter Pratt. This is not wholly explainable by the fact that Peter admires and is fond of his half-brother, John (see part I., Chapter IV.). Were not the senior master at Mamacock genial and hospitable, Peter Pratt’s freedom at this house could not be of the character described (by himself), neither would he be likely (as is, by his own account, afterwards the case) to espouse the cause of John Rogers, Sr., so heartily as to receive baptism at his hands, and go so far in that following as to be imprisoned with other Rogerenes.  According to his own statement, this young man was present at the County Court in 1699, when John Rogers appeared there with Mary Ransford and took her for his wife. He seems at that time to have been studying law in New London, and making Mamacock his headquarters.” 

On page 213 it says: (1707) “The home farm of John Bolles is half a mile south of that of John Rogers, on the same (Norwich) road, on a height of land known as Foxen’s Hill (later Bolles Hill), directly overlooking the town of New London, with a further view of Long Island Sound.3 He has lived for years in the near neighborhood of John Rogers, and has been one of his personal acquaintances and friends.”Well that’s enough for tonight.  I’ll pick this up again tomorrow.

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May 14, 2010 – Willow Branch Cemetery May 14, 2010

So because today is my friend Carolynne’s Birthday, I thought I’d run a calendar report in my genealogy program and see who else’s birthday it was today.  Here are the results:

May 14 Birthdays….Today Leonidas Lee Wells would have been 166 years old.  He was my 3rd cousin 3 times removed.  Elias Sheffield Wells would have been 188 years old.  He was my 3rd Cousin 3 times removed. George F. Rogers would have been 190 years old as my 2nd cousin 4 times removed.  Also Edward Rogers would have been a whoping 308 years old as my 2nd cousin 6 times removed and finally Joseph Rogers would have been an ancient 364 years old as my 6th great grand uncle.  Happy birthday guys, wherever you are.

Todays CEMETERY OF THE DAY is…. Willow Branch Cemetery, Waynesfield, OH (Auglaize Co.)… Located in Waynesfield, OH at the corner of Rt 67 and Moyer Road.  I picked Willow Branch today because I was going through some old notes I’d made about photo requests I wanted to make sure I put in on findagrave.com and before I threw them out, wanted to double-check that I’d put them in.  Turns out I had but since then quite a few had been filled and I must either have not gotten an email confirmation or deleted it by accident.  So I was pleasantly surprised.

Sylvia Wells Wells (1766 – Apr 11, 1849)3rd Great Grand Aunt (Sylvia’s parents,  Randall Wells & Lois Maxson are buried in the Wells Lot-HP005), Hopkinton, RI)

* Randall Wells (Jul 13, 1807 – Dec 17, 1880)1st Cousin 4Xs Removed 

* Harris Wells (Apr 1, 1809 – Nov 23, 1885)1st Cousin 4Xs Removed

* Sarah “Sally” LaGrange Wells (X – Jul 25, 1858)w/o Harris Wells

* Joseph Clark Wells (Feb 25, 1831 – May 5, 1893)2nd Cousin 3Xs Removed

* Martha Jetl Wells(1832 – 1919)w/o Joseph C. Wells  (Buried in Section B. with husband)

Children of Joseph Clarke Wells and Martha Jetl:

* Joseph A. Wells (1867 – Spe 27, 1887   )3rd Cousin 2Xs Removed

* John S. Wells (1856 – 1879)2nd Cousin 3Xs Removed

* Jennie Unknown Wells(X – 1883)w/o William H. Wells 3/2

* George R. Wells (1863 – 1936)3rd Cousin 2Xs Removed

Harriett Wells Akers(Dec 1871 – 1944)3rd Cousin 2Xs Removed

* Russell Vernon Wells (Aug 20, 1834 – Mar 6, 1914)2nd Cousin 3Xs Removed

* Orin H. Wells (Dec 28, 1842 – Sep 7, 1850)2nd Cousin 3Xs Removed

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May 13, 2010 – Wells Family Bible May 13, 2010

So I can see what people googled on and got my page.  I noticed today that someone had googled “brooklyn oysters 1900s recipes”.  I’m sorry to say they were probably disappointed with the outcome.

So I’m still riding the genealogical glow of discovering the resting place of John Rogers and fam.  I’m sure it will last a little bit as I’d really never expected to find it. (See yesterdays post for details).

What to talk about today…. well hold on a second and let me pop over to my hard drive chock full o goodies and see what I find.  Be right back…  OK, how about today we do the Wells Family Bible.  The bible is actually in the possession of my Cousin Dorothy but I was able to get it for a day to take scans and photos of it. 

The Wells Family Bible is an 1868 King James Version Printed by William W. Harding, Philadelphia 1868. Containing the Old and New Testaments, Translated out the original tongues together with the Apocrypha, Concordance and Psalms, and with the former translations diligently compared and revised. The Text conformable to the original edition of the year of Our Lord 1611 and the American Bible Society’s Original Standard Edition.

The Bible was given to Dorothy to her by her mother Sylvia Amelia Wells Eccleston.  We are not sure who the original purchaser of the bible was.  Most likely it was Williams Rogers Wells.  Dorothy says that the Bible did get damaged while in the possession of her mother during a hurricane in Rhode Island.

BIRTHS Page 1, column 1

Jonathan R. Wells

Was born at Hopkin-

Ton R.I. February 26th 1819.

Martha Ann Rogers

Wells was born at Waterford, Conn

February 15th 1825

Melisa J. Wells was

born at Hopkinton

R.I. March 15, 1847

Sylvia E. Wells was

born at Hopkinton

R.I. October 23rd 1849

Everett J. Wells was

born at Hopkinton

R.I. October 26th 1851

William Rogers Wells

was born at Hopkinton

R.I., June 9th, 1855

Martha Lillian Wells

was born at Hopkinton

R.I. December 13th 1860

Pauline Rudiger Stillman

Wellls was born at Alfred

Center New York Oct.15th 1855

BIRTHS Page 1, Column 2

1.Everett Stillman Wells

son of Wm. R. and Pauline

R. Wells was born in Hopkinton

August 12, 1881

2. Sylvia Amelia Wells

daughter of Wm. R and

Pauline R. Wells was

born in Hopkinton June 6, 1884

3. Willie Russell Wells

son of Wm. R and

Pauline R. Wells was

born in Hopkinton June 10, 1883

4. Orpha Wells daughter

of Wm. R and Pauline

R. Wells was born

Sept 7, 1886 at Woody Crest in New York City

5. William Rudiger Wells

Was born in Hopkinton R.I.

Dec 20th 1888

6. Forest Arlington Wells

Was born at Hopkinton

R.I. Dec 23rd 1900

Dorothy Pauline Wells

Daughter Wm. R and

Pauline R. Wells was born

at Hopkinton R.I. May 21st 1893

BIRTHS Page 2, Column 1

Nathaniel Dewey Wells

Son of Wm R + Pauline

Wells born May 2 1898

Elliot Ellsworth Wells

Son of Wm R + Pauline

Wells born Nov 3 1900

Children of Everett S and

Susie Clarke Wells           

Lois    Clarke    Wells  Oct 17 1910

Williams Rogers  “  July 15  1913

James Lewis          “     “   23  1915

Pauline Stillman “  April 8  1917

Nancy Newbury “ June 21, 1921

Nathaniel Greene “  Oct 28 1924

  Allan A. Simpson “   16    17

  Donald R Gardiner

sons of Orpha Wells Simpson Gardiner

  Katherine Wells

  Sally Wells

Daughters of Nathaniel D Wells

and Isabella

  Marie   born

  Natalie   “

Daughters of Forest + Helen Wells

  Myra V Wells  February 10, 1934

Daughter of Elliot E + Florence Wells

BIRTHS Page 2, Column 2

Children of E.S. + Susi Wells

Lois Wells          Oct 17 1910

Roger                July 15 1913

Jamie                July 23 1915

Pauline             Apr 8  1917

Nancy              June 21 1921

Nathaniel         Oct 28 1924

Dorothy Pauline Eccleston  July 19 1924

Daughter of Hugh and Sylvia Eccleston

Dale Suzanne Tarbox   July 22-1947

David Theodore Tarbox  April 20, 1950

Adam Nathaniel Tarbox  May 7, 1974

Xavier Alexander Tarbox Apr 15, 97

Son of Adam, Son of David

MARRIAGES

Jonathan R. Wells

And Martha Ann

Rogers were married

at Waterford, Conn

August 21st 1845

By Rev Daniel Lyon

Ephraim Lyon Witnesses

Clarissa Rogers

Sylvia E. Wells and

Elliot E. Salisbury were

married at Ashaway

R.I. Dec 9th 1868

By Rev. Alfred B Burdick

John D. Kenyon

Sarah J Kenyon Witnesses

William Rogers Wells

and Pauline Rudiger Stillman

were married at Alfred  Centre N.Y.

August 4th 1808

By

Rev. Ethan P. Larkin

Mrs S.E. Larkin  Witnesses

Amelia Stillman

Everett Stillman Wells

And Susie Clarke Lewis

Were married Aug. 29th 1909

By Rev. William L. Burdick

Sylvia A Wells & Hugh Eccleston

April 13, 1923 – by XXX Burdick

Orpha Wells  Alan Simpson

                         Waldo Gardiner

 William R. Wells & Gertrude Bynum

Dorothy P + Theodore Van Sickle

Forest G + Helen Wells

Nathaniel D + Isabelle

Elliot E. + Florence Weber

Lois W. + John Brett

James L + Olive

Pauline + William Hornberger

Nancyjo Smith

Roger Wells +

Allan Simpson, Patries Gooch

Donald Gardiner + Jane

Katherine Wells + Clair Black

Dorothy Eccleston + Edward Tarbox  Aug 31, 1946

David Theodore Tarbox + Kathleen Carn Sep 25, 1971?

Marie Wells +        Natalie +      Jean +

DEATHS

Melissa J. Wells died

May 10, 1859

Martha Lillian Wells

died February 26  1862

Everett J Wells died

June 9th 1870

Jonathan R. Wells

died December 8th 1864

Sylvia E (Wells)Salisbury

died September 29th 1880

Martha A Wells

died Feb 8th @ 12:30am 1903

Pauline R.S. Wells

died Feb 27th 1:35AM 1922

Wm R. Wells

died Dec 26, 1926

Everett S. Wells

died June 10, 1943

Susie C.L. Wells Jan 7, 1947

Elliot E. Wells Sept 1950

Hugh C Eccleston  Aug 4, 1954

Nancy N Smith  2/  / 1961

Orpha W Gardiner Mch 4, 1961

Florence J Wells Dec 12, 1961

Wm. R. Wells Jr. Dec 12, 1961

Willie Russell Wells son

of Wm r. and Pauline

R. Wells died July 24th 1883

Sylvia A. Eccleston 7/20/67

Nathaniel D. Wells  3/1/72

Forest Wells      1972

Dorothy P Van Sickle 

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May 12, 2010 – Rogers Cemetery at Mamacock Farm May 12, 2010

Mamacock Farm has been FOUND!!!!!  I can’t tell you how excited I was today to see my inbox.  I got emails back from some helpful folks from Connecticut College and yes, the Rogers Cemetery is indeed on their property. 

So todays CEMETERY OF THE DAY is the Rogers Cemetery at Mamacock Farm (or Mamacoke Farm as it is sometimes called) in New London, New London County, CT. 

Here are the directions to get there:    The cemetery is near the Thames River, just north of a college practice field called Dawley Field. It is next to a stream and along a trail. From Route 12 North, at the north corner of the Coast Guard Academy (and before you get to the Conn College entrance, turn right at the light onto Deshon St., which runs steeply down to the Thames River along the north side of the Academy campus.  A short way down the hill turn left on Nameaug Ave. follow it to the end and turn right on Farnsworth St.  Follow Farnsworth down to the railroad track at the foot (and the entrance to an old – shipyard) and turn left onto a dirt road that parallels the railroad.   This leads to a Connecticut College playing field and boathouse, and the Rogers cemetery is in the trees on the far edge of the playing field. You will see boulder, and a little brook marks the far boundary of the cemetery.  

So who’s buried there you ask.  Well this is who I know is there:

John Rogers Sr.  (Dec 1, 1648 – Oct 17, 1721  )  6th Great Grandfather

John Rogers Jr.   (Mar 20, 1674 – Jun 18, 1753 ) 5th Great Grandfather

Bathsheba Smith Rogers (X – Jan 28, 1722 )w/o John Rogers Jr.

Ichabod Rogers (X – X )  Relationship Unknown.. I was told that there was a stone there with the name Ichabod Rogers on it but that this stone was stolen from the cemetery a number of years ago. I’m thinking this might be the Ichabod that was a son of John Rogers Jr.

These names come from a few sources but mostly from the book “The Rogerenes”.  The book also says that the children of John Rogers Jr. that died before him were buried here.  One of the gentlemen for CT College that emailed me back with the directions attached a study that the college did of the cemetery using ground penetrating radar that showed over 40 bodies there!  He didn’t know of any list of who was there so I have to keep looking for one.  unfortunately it was probably lost over time like the list of who is buried at the Old Rogerene Cemetery in Ledyard.  There are a few surviving grave stones that you can see in the picture below but no one seems to know whats on them so… if you’re in the New London, CT area and what to go take a look…. let me know what you find out.

Here’s a photo of the cemetery.

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May 11, 2010 – Rachel Larrabee and Alexander Rogers May 11, 2010

Kathleen sent me a message that she was looking for information on Rachel Larrabee, wife of Alexander Rogers, so this info is for you Kathleen.  Hope it helps.   Rachel was born on March 1, 1755.  I got this date from the source listed below but would not say that I feel 100% on it.  She married Alexander Rogers Sr. on May 7, 1777 in New London County, CT.  I do not know when she died except to say that it was after 1790 which is the birth year of my Great, Great, Great Grandfather, Daniel Rogers, the last of her children born.   She is mentioned as being buried in the Old Rogerene Cemetery in Ledyard, CT (Quakertown Area).  I do not know who her parents are.  There are a few Larrabee families in the area but I have been unable to connect her to any specific one of them.  I sometimes see her name as spelled Larrabee and sometimes as Larabee.

1790 Federal Census: New London County, CT

Head of Household: Alexander Rogers (Senior)

Free white males 16 +: 3 ……… Free white males under 16: 2

Free white females: 6 (Rachel Larrabee + 4 daughters + ?)…….All other: 0

Slaves: 0  (there are many people on this page with slaves)

(Alexander Rogers is 2 names below Davis Newbury on this census)

______________________________________________

History of Montville, Connecticut, By Henry Augustus Baker, Published by , 1896, Page 185-186

Children by second wife.

94.   Alexander, b. 13 June, 1728; m. 1st, Grace Rogers; 2nd. Rachel Larrabee

______________________________________________

History of Montville, Connecticut, By Henry Augustus Baker, Published by , 1896, Page 198

IV. ALEXANDER (94),b. 13 June 1728, ninth son of John Rogers by second wife, Elizabeth Dodge; married 1st, Grace, daughter of ____.  She died without issue.  He afterwards married Rachel Larrabee.

Children.

228.   Alexander, b. 20 July 1779; m. Nancy Green.

229.   Desire, twin to Alexander; m. John Watrous.

230.   Sarah, b. 1784; m. Zephaniah Watrous

231.   Rachel, b. 1786: m. Timothy Watrous

232.   Nancy, b. 1788: m. Henry Watrous

233.   Daniel, b. 1790: m. Sarah Newberry

______________________________________________

From: ttp://www.rays-place.com/town/new-london/new-london14.htm

New London, CT Vital Records 1649 – 1854…From the Barbour Collection, Transcribed by Coralynn Brown

Surnames Lamasey to Leonard

LARRABEE …. Rachel, m. Alexander ROGERS, May 7, 1777

______________________________________________

From: New London, New London Co., CT,   1646 – 1854 Vital Records from Barbour, R Transcribed by Coralynn Brown

 Alexander, m. Rachel LARABEE, May 7, 1777

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~jdevlin/barbour/newlond_main.htm

___________________________________________________

New London, CT Vital Records 1649 – 1854…From the Barbour Collection, Transcribed by Coralynn Brown

 Rogers Surname

Alexander, m. Rachel LARABEE, May 7, 1777

Alexander, son John, son John & Elizabeth, b. Jan. 3, 1728/9

Alexander, twin with Desire, son Alexander & Rachel, b. July 20, 1780

____________________________________________________

From: The antecedents and descendants of Noah Whipple of the Rogerene community at Quakertown, Connecticut. With additional sections by Robert W. Merriam. By Clara Hammond McGuigan (Pages 269-276) as mentioned on http://home.comcast.net/~schultz3025/Old_Rogerene_Cemetery.htm

THE FOLLOWING LIST of people buried in the old Rogerene cemetery appears as an appendix to Antecedents and Descendants of Noah Whipple (269-276). It is preceded there by the observation that “names are not in order of burial probably.”

RACHEL LARRABEE ROGERS, born Mar. 1, 1755, widow of Alexander Rogers.

________________________________

I’ve been to the Rogerene Cemetery in Ledyard.  It’s really is in someone’s back yard.  They are very nice folks.  I went up and knocked on their door and said “Hello, I’m looking for the cemetery in your back yard”.  It is located between 7 & 9 Red Brook Ln, Ledyard, CT      From the street if you look between the houses, you can see a stone wall that runs along the back of their property.  If you walk between the houses you will see a broken spot in the wall that you can get through.  The cemetery is about 10 yards at the most from there.  You will see the large stone at the top of the cemetery.    It has “ROGERENE CEMETERY 1740” on it.

None of the stones in this cemetery have any markings on them.  The Rogerenes believed that engraved stones were pagan and only put numbers or initials on them.  I’ve read that they usually numbered them and kept a paper that had a list of who was buried in each number.  When I visited this cemetery, I saw one or two with letters but none with numbers.

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May 10, 2010 – Rogers Family of New London May 10, 2010

Today I did more research to try to find the location of the Rogers Family Farm, Mamacock Farm (or Mamacoke Farm as I’ve sometimes seen it).  From what I can tell, I think it is inside the Connecticut College Aboretum.  I sent an email to the Arboretum to see if they had any info on a cemetery on site.  Hopefully I’ll hear something back from them.  I found a reference to the Farm in a book I found on Google Books.    It’s called “Tapestry A living History of the Black Family in Southeastern Connecticut” by James M. Rose and it talks about John Rogers and his family and the slaves they owned.   I’d heard mumors before that the Rogers family had slaves but hadn’t seen much.   The book has some interesting information on the Native American slave and his wife, an african american woman who was also a slave of John Rogers.  It’s unclear in this book as how they became slaves of John.  It seems to infer that the Native American sold himself for a certain period of time to John as a slave/servent.   No one wants to admit that thier ancestor was a slave owner but at least John seemed to have the intetion of giving them their freedom when he died.   I kind of like finding out these dark secrets hidden deep in the family tree.  It’s human nature to only want to remember the good things about people after they are dead but thats not an honest way to look at history.  It’s important to accept the fact that our ancestors were all flawed people and made mistakes just like we do. 

Heres that info out the book, Tapestry …..Tapestry by James M. Rose

In the preface of this book, the author mentions that he visited the site of the Mamcock Farm Graveyard!  I tried to track him down on the internet but couldn’t locate him so, Dr. James M. Rose, if you’re reading this, please, PLEASE, help a gal out and send me a note with directions to the graves of the Rogers.  I’m enjoying your book by the way.

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May 7, 2010 – John Rogers Sr. (1648-1721) May 7, 2010

Today I was researching the burial place of my 6th Great Grandfather John Rogers Sr. (Dec 1, 1648 – Oct 17, 1721).  John was buried on his farm, Mamacock Farm.  I’ve never really know where it was but today I found some clues to it’s location.

History of Montville, Connecticut, By Henry Augustus Baker, 1896, Pages 179-181

“b. 1 Dec., 1648, third son of James Rogers and Elizabeth  Rowland; m. 17 Oct., 1670, Elizabeth, daughter of Mathew Griswold. The rite of marriage was performed by the father of the bride, and accompanied with the formality of a written contract and dowry, the husband settling his farm at upper Mamacock upon the wife in case of his death or separation from her during life.. This farm was situated about two miles north of New London, on the Thames River…….  …………He died of small pox 17 Oct., 1721, and was buried upon the bank of the Tames River within the bounds of his Mamacock farm, where he had set aside a place for a family sepulcher.”

According to page 60 of the History of Montville, there were two places called Mamacock.  One was the neck of land on which stand Fort Trumball and the other was two miles up the river. It does not say up the river from where.  Page 116 says John Rogers owned the land at Upper Mamacock.

 I found this in the book “The Rogerenes”, page 279-280:  “The early graves still discernable in this old family burying-ground are marked by natural, uninscribed stones, which was the ordinary mode before gravestones came into common use in New England.  In family burying-placed, on farms or in out-of-the-way places, the lack of inscriptions continued to a comparatively late period.  Many such old family buying-places have been long obliterated.  The preservation of this one is probably due to its being secured by deed.  (See New London Record, November 13, 1751)  It is said that, despite the lack of inscription, descendants in the earlier part of the nineteenth century could tell who was buried in each of the old graves.  The railroad has cut off a portion of this burial ground, which originally extended to the verge of the river.  Tradition states that some of the graves on the river bank were washed away at the time of the great September gale (1813).”

Speaking of the death of John Rogers Jr.( son of John Rogers Sr.) on page 279 it says: “Fifteen children gather at Mamacock, to follow the remains of this honored father to the grave…. They lay the form of this patriarch beside his father, his wife Bathsheba and the children gone before, in the ground he has set apart, in the southeast corner of his farm, as a perpetual burial place for his descendants, close by the beautiful river that washes Mamacock.  They mark his grave, like the others in this new ground, by two rough stones, from nature’s wealth of granite in this locality, whose only tracery shall be the lichen’s mossy green of tender mould.”

On page 280 it says” “John Rogers, 2d, was a man of remarkable thrift….consisted mainly of a number of valuable farms on both sides of the Norwich road, including the enlarged Mamacock farm, the central part of which (Mamacock proper) , his home farm, “

On page 124 it says: “ he takes up his abode in one of his houses in town, or possible at the mamacock farm, on the Mohegan road and the “Great River”, which place was formerly granted by the town to the Rev. Mr. Blinman, and, upon the latter’s removal from New London, was purchased by Mr. Rogers”

On page 194 it says” John Rogers has changed his home from the Great Neck to Mamacock Farm, North Parish”

From the above we can gather that Mamacock was on the Thames River.  It was at least 2 miles north of the mouth of the river.  It was on the west bank of the river as the burial spot was located on the river, in the southeast corner of the farm.  Railroad tracks were cut through some portion of the burial ground.  The farm was along side the Norwich Road and the Mohegan Road.  It was located in North Parish.

State Road 32 runs up along the west bank of the Thames and is called on and off Mohegan Avenue and Norwich Road.   I found on a map today a place called Mamacock Cove which is just south of Quaker Hill, CT and across the river from the Sub Base Museum.  It looks like it’s probably the general area.  I need to find out who I can contact to see if there is a cemetery near there of field stones.  How exciting if I could find that cemetery.

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May 6, 2010 – Daniel Rogers, born 1790 May 6, 2010

Today I finally finished my first draft of my updated cemetery listing.  Topped out at 85 pages long.  Now I just need to edit it.

So today’s ANCESTOR OF THE DAY is Daniel Rogers, my Great, Great, Great Grandfather.  Daniel was born in New London County, Connecticut on March 12, 1790 to parents Alexander Rogers Sr. and Rachel Larrabee.     Daniel was a farmer in Waterford, CT near Quaker Hill.  To be honest, I’m not really sure what the boundaries of Quaker Hill are.  It seems to be north of Waterford on a map but I’m guessing is more on an unincorporated hamlet at best.   Daniel shows up on the Waterford census but is buried in Union Cemetery in Quaker Hill.   Daniel married Sally Newbury on September 2, 1813.  They went on to have 10 children including my Great, Great Grandmother Martha Ann Rogers who married Jonathan Russell Wells.

Here is the bare bones data I’ve collected on Daniel.

1830 Federal Census: Waterford, CT

Name of head of household: Daniel Rogers

Males 5-10: 3

Males 40-50: 1

Females 5-10: 2

Females 10-15: 3

Females: 15-20: 1

Females: 30-40: 1  

Total living in Household: 11

(4 names above Daniel on the census is his brother Alexander Rogers Jr.)

________________________________________

1840 Federal Census: June 16, 1840  Waterford, CT

Name of head of household: Daniel Rogers

Males 5-10: 1

Males 15-20: 3

Males 20-30: 1

Males 50-60: 1

Females under 5: 2

Females 10-15: 1

Females 15-20: 1

Females: 20-30: 2

Females: 40-50: 1

Total living in Household: 13

________________________________________

1850 Census: Oct 18, 1850  Waterford, CT

Daniel Rogers… Age: 60 … Occupation: Farmer … Value of Real Estate Owned: 1500

Place of birth: Connecticut … Others living in same household: Sally Rogers (wife), Isaac N Rogers (son), Clarissa Rogers (daughter), Ephraim B. Rogers (son).

________________________________________

1860 Census: September 11, 1860  Waterford, CT

Daniel Rogers… Age: 70 … Occupation: Farmer

Value of Real Estate Owned: 1600 … Value of personal estate: 130

Place of birth: Connecticut

Others living in same household: Sally Rogers (wife), William Rogers, Matilda Lewis (relationship unknown, age 22), Eugene Lewis (relationship unknown, age 4)

____________________________________

1870 Federal Census: August 8, 1870   Waterford, CT

Daniel Rogers… Age: 80 … Sex: Male … Rage: White

Occupation: Farmer … Place of Birth: Connecticut

Others Living in same household: William Rogers (son, age 44), William Rogers (relationship unknown, age 12)

___________________________________

History of Montville, Connecticut

By Henry Augustus Baker, Published by , 1896, Page 205

V. DANIEL (233), b. 1790, son of Alexander Rogers and Rachel larrabee; married 2 Sept, 1813, Sally Newberry, daughter of David Newberry.  He died____.  Sheid died 16 Dec., 1861.

Children.

443.   Sarah, b. 18 Jan., 1815:. Hubbard Holdridge

444.   Rachel, b. 17 Nov., 1817: m. Charles Wheeler

445.   Lydia, b. 10 June, 1818; m. Raymond Lamb.

446.   Catherine, b. 4 Sept., 1819; died young

447.   Amos W., b. 18 May, 1821; died 27 March 1847

448.   Isaac, b.20 May 1823; m. ___ Whipple

449.   Williams, b. 15 Feb., 1825; m. 1st. Martha Sanders, 2d, Mary Landphere

450.   Martha, b. twin to Williams; m. Jonathan Hill

451.   Clarissa, b. 22 Nov., 1829; m. Anson G. Baker

452.   Ephraim, b. 2 June, 1831: m. Phebe Ames

______________________________________

So these are the only references I’ve found on Daniel in books and records.  So what else do we know about him.  Well, the Rogers were a very religious family.  From my Great Aunt Dot’s memoirs, she says of Daniel’s daughter Martha Ann “Martha was a Quaker, but helped support the church in every way and we all grew up in that church atmosphere, a rich inheritance.”  From my study of the Wells family, I can tell you that before Martha Ann married into the family there is practically no mention of church membership.  After Martha Ann, they all went to church. 

Daniel was the Great Grandson of John Rogers who started the religious movement known as the Rogerenes.  John’s son, John Jr, continued the movement and I think it’s safe to say that if Martha Ann was a staunch Quaker, she got that from her dad.

From Aunt Dot’s memoirs I would hazard to guess that they didn’t have a lot of money.  Aunt Dot writes “Martha Ann Rogers, his wife, who came from Quaker Hill, Conn. to work in the mill.”  Martha Ann had to leave Connecticut to come work in the Mill owned by the Wells family, which is how she met her husband.  It’s safe to say that if they could have afforded her to stay home, she probably would have.

Aunt Dot also wrote of Martha Ann (her grandmother) “I remember going with her on the stage coach (like the west) driven by “big old black Bill Johnson” who had size 14 shoes; he was so big I remember because I got my fingers pinched in a door.  We went to Westerly and got the train to New London to go up to Quaker Hill to visit her twin Uncle Williams, at her old house.”  From this I would gather that the house she had lived in, which I’m guessing was her father’s house, was not occupied by her brother Williams.   Aunt Dot was born in 1893 which is well after Daniel died so the house must have stayed in the family after his passing.

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May 5, 2010 – Lithonia City Cemetery May 5, 2010

Well its Wednesday.   I’ve had an odd day.  One one had it felt like a Monday and on the other hand, “It’s not Saturday yet??”  Not that Saturday will be that great.  I’m working my part-time job at Disney on Saturday so I won’t be off anyway.    This morning while I was getting ready for work I was watching a show on the History Channel on the war of 1812.  I have to say that I can’t remember studying the war of 1812 at school.  What happened there?  Guess we’re doomed to repeat that one.

So today’s CEMETERY OF THE DAY is Lithonia City Cemetery, Lithonia, GA (DeKalb Co.) and here’s my relatives buried here:  *Wells, William Orrin(Mar 27, 1881 – Mar 28, 1970)4th Cousin 2Xs Removed (William’s parents, Leonidas Lee Wells and Mary Angeline Overman are in Shelfer Cemetery, Havana, FL)

*Wells, Otie Bales(May 24, 1890 – Dec 7, 1971)w/o William O. Wells

*Keckley, Thelma Lee Wells(Apr 21, 1914 – Jan 20, 2009)5th Cousin 1X Removed

*Keckley, Wallis B.(Mar 30, 1913 – Aug 30, 1997)h/o Thelma L. Wells

*Wells, Alice Mable(Feb 27, 1911 – Jun 21, 1911)5th Cousin 1X Removed …Alice has 2 stones.  One says “Our Baby, IN MEMORIAM, ONE GRAVE MOVED IN 1957 FROM THOMPSON CEMETERY WITHIN BUFORD DAM AND RESERVOIR PROJECT ERECTED BY CORPS OF ENGINEERS US ARMY”

 FAMILY LETTERS

Ruth Hubbard Burdick, my 7th Great Grand mother was born on January 11, 1670 in Agawam (Springfield), Hamden, Massachusetts.  She was married to the Reverend Robert Burdick on November 2, 1655 in Newport, Rhode Island and died in 1690-1691 in Westerly.   Here is an interesting letter that she wrote that I came across some time back.

From: The Early History of Narragansett, By: Elisha R. Potter Jr.   Published MDCCCXXXV, Collections of the Rhode Island Historical Society Vol. III  Page 117-118

“The following letter was written from Westerly, August 4, 1666, by Mrs. Ruth Burdick, to her father, Samuel Hubbard, at Newport. Mr. Hubbard was born in England, in 1610, and came over in 1663. Of his daughters, Ruth married Robert Burdick, Bethiah married Joseph Clark, Jr., and Rachel married Andrew Langworthy. [Backus I. 416 and 475. III. 227.]

Several of Mr. Hubbard’s family settled at Westerly.— Backus says that Naomi Burdick, grand-daughter of Mr. Hubbard, had married Jonathan Rogers, and that on March 2nd, 1678, Elder Hiscox baptised her at Westerly, with James Babcock, George Lamphiere, and two others. Mr. Hubbard’s daughter Ruth had joined Mr. Clarke’s church in 1652, when about 18 years old.

“Most loving and dear father and mother, my duty with my husband and children presented unto you with all my dear friends. My longing desire is to hear from you, how your hearts are borne up above these troubles which are come upon us and are coming as we fear; for we have the rumors of war, and that almost every day. Even now we have heard from your island by some Indians, who declared unto us that the French have done some mischief upon the coast, and we have heard that 1200 Frenchmen have joined with the Mohawks to clear the land both of English and of Indians. But I trust in the Lord, if such a thing be intended, that he will not suffer such a thing to he. My desire and prayer to God is, that be will be pleased to fulfil his promise to us, that is, that as in the world we shall have troubles, so in him we shall have peace. The Lord of comfort, comfort your and our hearts, and give us peace in believing and joy in the Holy Ghost. Oh that the Lord would be pleased to fill our hearts with his good spirit, that we may be carried above all these things! and that we may remember his saying, ‘When ye see these things come to pass, lift up your heads, knowing that your redemption draws nigh.’ Then if these things be the certain sign of our Lord’s return, let us mind his command, that is, pray always that ye may be counted worthy to escape all these things, and to stand before the son of man. Let us have boldness to come unto him in the new and living way which he has prepared for us. Through grace I find the Lord doth bear up the spirits of his in this place, in some com­fortable measure to be looking above these things, the Lord increase it more and more unto the day of his appearing, which I hope is at hand. Dear father and mother, the Lord hath been pleased to give us here many sweet and comforta­ble days of refreshing, which is great cause of thankfulness, and my desire is that we may highly prize it, and you with us give the Lord praise for his benefit. I pray remember my love to all my dear friends with you in fellowship. Sister Sanders desires to be remember to you all, so doth sis­ter Clarke. Your loving daughter, to my power,

“RUTH BURDICK.”

I love this letter.  I often think of it when I hear folks say that given all the hardship and strife in our times, the end of the world must be near, that the time of the rapture must be upon us.  I think every age has thought the same thing.  Here we see Ruth thinking that back in 1666.

Here is another letter written by Ruth Hubbard.

From: Seventh Day Baptists in Europe and America: A Series of Historical Papers, By Albert N. Rogers, Seventh Day Baptist General Conference, Pages 646- 

“While the beginning of the history of Seventh-day Baptists in the vicinity of Waterford was in 1675, only nine years after the members of the Baptist church began to keep the Sabbath in Newport and Misquamicut. Just how the people about New London had their attention directed to the subject does not appear in the original documents, but we know that they were only twenty miles from the Sabbath-keepers in western Rhode Island and fifty from those in Newport and that the families were connected by marriage. The first mention of Sabbath observers here is in a letter which Ruth Burdick wrote March 6, 1675, from Westerly to her father, Samuel Hubbard, in Newport. The letter reads:

“I judge it my duty to make use of this opportunity to impart to you the dealings and good hand of our God unto us. He hath been at work, as we believe, in the hearts of some of the inhabitants of New London, and bowing their hearts to be obedient unto the Lord Jesus. The names of them is John Rogers, James Rogers his brother and the third an Indian whose name is Japheth: who gave a very satisfactory account of the work of grace wrought upon his heart. There be four more that sent to us desiring our prayers for them, and as for our part, we five are in love, and with one heart in what is revealed. As for Brother Randall he is highly displeased with brother Maxon about the Sabbath. Brother Crandall hath the ague and fever still, and has been but little amongst us this winter. Upon the I3th day of this month our brethren came again from New London to give us a visit and to partake in the ordinance of breaking of bread : with them another young man who is satisfied as to baptism but judges himself unfit. They declaring what joys and comforts they have found, and what they have met with from the sons of men. Mr. Bradstreet. the minister of the place, being enraged threatened them, warning them not to speak to any of his church, railing against us all that profess believers only to be baptized. Threatened Brother Crandall, saying he shall be ordered next court. Mr. Fitch of Norwich also said lie did hope the next court would take a course with Brother Crandall. Many such like words from many others we hear of. They have earnestly (requested) us to give them a meeting at our brother John Rogers’ house; but I fear brother Crandall’s weakness of body will hinder him, and here is none able to carry on the work there among them. For my part and I think many more would be very glad to see brother Hiscox here, and one more with him, and send them word a week before to give the people notice: they judge there would be many that would be there to hear and some to be baptized.”
It appears from this letter that Elder John Crandall had already been in New London witnessing for the truth, that he had baptized and received into fellowship John and James Rogers and an Indian named Japheth, that he had been threatened by the authorities, that there were others who were interested, that those received into fellowship had been to Westerly twice, joining with the Sabbath-keepers there in the celebration of the Lord’s Supper, and that it was desired that some one be sent from Newport to New London to carry on the work already commenced. The Newport church responded at once to the request and Mr. Hiscox, Mr. Hubbard and Joseph Clarke were sent this same month. “

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May 3, 2010 – Ephraim B and Isaac N Rogers May 3, 2010

Seems like it’s been a few days since I last posted.  Was really sick for about a week and it really knocked me on my but.   Can’t remember the last time I got that sick for that long.  I did manage to get to Tampa yesterday but much to my chagrin, the Providence Cemetery was closed.  Had I felt better, I’d have hopped the fence.  Kind of odd that it was closed on a Sunday afternoon.   O well, we’ll try again sometime this summer.

Whalemens Shipping List pg 242 4th colmn Rogers Brothers 1853

So today I thought I would talk about my Rogers Uncles, the whalers.  A while ago, I was surfing the internet looking for the burial place of a couple of brothers of my Great, Great, Grandmother, Martha Ann Rogers Wells and came across the above posted item.  Look on page 242 in the 4th column from the left and you see them.  

This article in the Whalemen’s Shipping List lists Ephraim B. Rogers of Waterford, Conn as Second Mate and Isaac N. Rogers as Third Mate of the Adeline Gibbs in October 1853.  Ephraim and Isaac were brothers of Martha Ann Rogers, my Great, Great Grandmother (with of Jonathan Russell Wells) making them my Great, Great Grand Uncles.  The Adeline Gibbs was a Bark, built in 1841 in Fairhaven, MA    She wrecked in a hurricane off Bermuda in August 1890.  I found a few references to the travels of the Adeline Gibbs.  Seems the traveled the North Atlantic and also sailed to Australia and the South Pacific.  They must have had plenty of stories to tell when they got back home to Waterford.

Here is some censusus information on Ephraim that show him as a mariner.

1850 Census: Oct 18, 1850   Waterford, CT

Ephraim B. Rogers   Age: 19

Occupation: Mariner … Place of birth: Connecticut

Others living in same household: Daniel Rogers (father), Sally Rogers (mother), Isaac N Rogers (brother), Clarissa Rogers (sister).

1860 Census: July 27, 1860   Montville, CT

Ephraim Rogers  Age: 32

Occupation: Seaman   Value of personal estate: 1500

Place of birth: Connecticut

Others living in same household: Elisabeth Aimes (listed as occupation housekeeper, age 64), Philbert Rogers (relationship unknown, age 30), Ernest Rogers (relationship unknown, age 5), Erasmus D Aimes (Relationship unknown, occupation Carpenter, age 28)

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April 29, 2010.. Providence Cemetery April 29, 2010

Sorry no posts for a few days.  Been sick.   This Sunday I’m going to be in Tampa so I’m going to visit today’s CEMETERY OF THE DAY…  Providence Cemetery, Riverview, FL (Hillsborough Co.)  5416 Providence Road, Riverview, Florida,

Brandon, Ada Alberta Wells (Jul 30, 1879 – Mar 9, 1965)4th Cousin 2Xs Removed  (Ada’s parents, Leonidas L. Wells ad Mary Angeline Overman are in Shelfer Cemetery, Havana, FL. 

Brandon, John William Sr.(1867 – 1920/1928)h/u Ada A. Wells

I noticed on the map that I drive through Brandon, FL on the way to the cemetery.  Humm… any relation you think?? Could be.  I couldn’t find that there was any other relatives in this cemetery but these doesn’t seem to be much complete info that I can find on this cem.   Sounds like and Adventure…. gee my life is sad.    I’ll let you know what I find there next week.

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April 25, 2010 Memoir of Dorothy P. Wells Van Sickle April 25, 2010

Been a busy weekend.  Guess I missed posting for a couple of days but I’m back.   I visited with one of my cousins who gave me some new information.  She said that her dad told her that my Great Grandfather, John Kranz had two brothers named Stefan (Stephan) and Frederick.  So the Kranz name here in America may not have died out after all.  More investigation is needed to find these Kranz brothers.  I did a preliminary search on ancestry.com but seems like it won’t be an easy task.  She also told me that her brother has a son so there is another male Geoghan child to help carry on the name.  Yeah!  Happy news.

So today I thought I would share the memoir that my great-aunt Dorothy Pauline Wells Van Sickle wrote.  I remember Aunt Dot.  She lived in Rockaway, NJ and we used to go visit her pretty often.  We lived in Wading River, NY out on Long Island.   Dorothy passed away February 4, 1976, when I was about 5 and a half years old.   She was the last of her siblings to pass away. 

 Dorothy Pauline Wells Van Sickle
My Great Aunt, Sister of my Grandfather Elliott Wells, Daughter of William Rogers Wells & Pauline Stillman.  Here are two of my favorite pictures of Dorothy.

Things I Remember
By Dorothy Pauline Wells Van Sickle

Russell and Lydia Wells, parents of Jonathan, Thomas R., Randall and Silas, Jonathan and Thomas were mill owners of the Ashaway Woolen Mills, Bethel Mills, and Clark Falls Mills.
Wells property along the Ashawaug River and the land east of the river was donated to the Town for the Oak Grove Cemetery.  Therein lie the graves of Russell and Lydia.  The custodian of the cemetery has the Original Map (Clare Crandall) also, the grave of Jonathan and Martha Ann Rogers, his wife, who came from Quaker Hill, Conn. to work in the mill. 

They had 4 children:  Sylvia, Everett, Melissa, Mattie, Willie.   Jonathan was a kind considerate courageous man from my father’s point of view and judging from the strict way my father brought us up, yet tender and loving and full of care especially to the ill or competent.  Jonathan died in 1864, during the Civil War. 

Willie was 9 years old.  He told us how his father once gave him a cigar to smoke and let him try and it made him deathly sick.  He did not try again till he was a man.  The death of his father was the reason Martha could not carry on the business and sold the Ashaway mill to the Brigges.  The Clarks Falls mill was sold; the Bethel mill was kept till I was a little girl.  This, my father ran when he was of age.  Everett died at the age of 19.  The two girls Melissa and Mattie died young of Tuberculosis, also my grandfather and grandmother.  They lived in the old Red House (Greenman).  In 1855 my father (was) born there.   My grandfather had built this lovely Italian style home of 22 rooms with halls and pantries included and a cupola and a piazza that went all the way around.  It is a copy of a home in Groton.  The third floor had a mansard roof.  It sat on 4 acres, had a workshop under which was the woodshed of a wagon house and a corn crib within the 4 acres which were enclosed by a stone wall on the north, east and south and up to the driveway a big wooden gate.  There was a 2 ft. granite block to keep out huge rats from the (barn) and barnyard.  A 2 ft stone wall to which was attached a flat topped fence, 2 gates for the circle driveway that led to huge granite steps to the side porch both for the front door and back door with its own granite steps and walk the piazza at the kitchen door.  I remember the water closet (as my father always called it) between the workshop and the wagon house.  It was a 3 seater with a small seat at the right and a Sears, Roebuck catalog for reading for the youngsters, a tin roof the same as the piazza on top of which was a big house, the replica of the big house with doors for 4 families.  A five foot arch trellised to the W.C. over which ran a grape vine and hid the entrance.  Between the W.C. and the wagon house were lilacs and other garden perennials.  In the circle, were two Normandy spruces (carefully we’d climb to the top to be equal to the top of the house).  Here we had a hammock between the spruces.  We had an Arborvita at the back door and one wall and wagon gate, a Maple and wisteria around the back door on the side, and the tree at the corner the fence was a spruce also.  There were three elms in the front by the fence.  On either side of the front granite slab walk was a horse chestnut tree at the left from the front door and a sweet fringe tree. (The like of which I never saw except in the N.Y. Botanical Gardens).  Pear orchards at the side of the house, and apple orchard in back, –Baldwin, Red Astricans, Pound Sweetings, Russet, Johathans, Snow in the Spring, bowers of flowers and fragrance from the blossoms, asparagus in the spring, strawberries in June are some of the things I remember.

Jonathan was a Colonel in the Dorr Rebellion to get a vote for all rather then just the landlords.  He had a lot of tenement houses on Knight Street and up the Bethel Mill.  He was called Colonel Wells ever after.  He had the First National Bank in Ashaway and was head of it.  (He must have had too many irons in the fire; ran himself to death).  That left Martha with the mills to dispose of, except the Bethel Mill, 48 acres besides the 4 on which the house and buildings were built, the old Red House, cow barns, fields for corn, potatoes, pumpkins, hay in the south field, and wood lots, east to the top of the hill where the old Indian burial ground was (so they said, might have been early settlers).  The original tract granted by the King extended from Kingston to the Wellstown Bridge on the Ashawaug River. 

Back in the 17th century, Wells’ lived on either side of the river.  Uncle Randall and Uncle Silas both lived on the west side.  Jonathan and Silas’ son, Wallace, on the east side.  Bethel Mill was on the southwest, a row of tenements for the mill workers, west of the river.  I do not know how it got divided.  Ashaway is a nice little town with a Seventh Day Baptist Church a block from our house.  Martha was a Quaker, but helped support the church in every way and we all grew up in that church atmosphere, a rich inheritance.  Friday night, Prayer meeting. Sabbath School, Church services, (Junior) Christian Endeavor, Senior Christian Endeavor; 5 services.  At sundown we didn’t play or have a good time for the Sabbath began Friday at Sundown and ended Saturday at sundown.  We were never allowed to play games till after sundown.  We could take walks, or papa would take us for a ride in the surrey or in the sleigh.  My grandmother had a brougham in which she sat back with a head sized parasol (which we children loved to play Victoria with, an angle to make it turn to suit her fancy, fascinated us till we broke it after her death).  She had a special horse, Old Dan, that she hitched to a buggy.  I remember going with her on the stage coach (like the west) driven by “big old black Bill Johnson” who had size 14 shoes; he was so big I remember because I got my fingers pinched in a door.  We went to Westerly and got the train to New London to go up to Quaker Hill to visit her twin Uncle Williams, at her old house.
I remember going down stairs to visit with Grand Ma, to sew pieces of rags an inch wide together to make a ball for rag carpet.  We also played Parcheesi, checkers and backgammon.  Then I remember eating with her; apple sauce in thumbnail glass dishes and scurrying up the dark stairs of the front hall.  I remember sitting on the little step in the kitchen that led up into our back stair and the happy face of Uncle Williams coming in her back door.  Skip and I used to peer in her windows:  she scolded us for that saying it was not nice, come inside instead. (We had gone around the whole porch doing just that at every window, thinking it was smart).  I remember going to church with my grandmother, sitting in the front seat and her partaking of the wine from one big cup that every one put to his lips a day before the individual glasses that I drank from after I was baptized and joined the church).  My grandmother had pneumonia and Papa was with her day and night- a good son.  Papa shed tears at the funeral; they ran down his cheeks (the only time I saw my father cry, except at my mother’s funeral).  Martha was 77 when she passed away.  Papa used to take us to the woods and gather wild flowers and grasses, perennials that made lovely old fashioned bouquets which we put in the boys cart in latter days and went to put them on the graves.  In season, Papa carried flowers up to the cemetery every week, after Grandma died.
The house was light blue, with a piazza all the way around, a red tinned roof, a mansard shingled third floor, 10 dormers and the cupola a flight of stairs around against the cupola, where we could sit and look over hill and town, two chimneys at right and left and below on the second floor over the dinning room and kitchen and pantry was another chimney.  We kids loved to go up and even climb down on to the tin roof below by the mansard shingled dormer in back.  Father forbad us saying we would dent the tin roof and railing around the sides and back and we walked that.  In back a drop of 18 ft never phased us but must have scared our mother speechless.  The boys, Bill and Skip taught me to look ahead, not down on all the fence walks, house or yard.  Granite steps led down to the back yard and garden and to the entrance of the basement (besides from the kitchen door down inside).  The basement had a wooden floor, cupboards for preserves, a shelf along a raised section on which were 5 or 6 barrels for apple vinegar, more shelves with empty glass jars for preserves, a 6 foot wooden bath tub that was used by my grandfather, my Papa told me, and work bench and a sink. Beyond on the stone ledge was the furnace and closed off was a dirt floor where we kept potatoes, carrots, parsnips, barrels of apples, too, in the dark vegetable cellar.
To get to the house we had a stone flag walk or a flagstone walk to the two door entrance, using the right, the hall at the left, the music room with its two baby grands, (Mothers and grandmothers).  Grandmother’s was removed for we used to sing to the Knabe, Mama playing.  Papa singing baritone, grand roue, and the children joining in).  The music room had a marble fireplace and a black iron grill and protector, and a long black horse hair sofa and chairs with carved rosewood backs, a tip-top table and screen of three sections (paintings of Aunt Eleanor’s Hollyhocks, Thistles and Wild Flowers).  We practiced there, Orpha more than the rest.  She had the gift of music in her voice and fingers.


On either side of the fireplace was a picture of Jonathan and Martha.  On the north wall hung Mother’s Cala Lilly, later The Milkmaid painting.  The three windows were shaded by dark green shades and lace curtains.  The carpet was a pale green with pink roses in the center and around the border.  Between the window hung the mirror (that I have in the step down room).  My grandmother was laid out in that room.  When Florence and Elliot had it they made it into a Tea Room – -The Singing Kettle.

At the right of the hall was the sitting room, a mahogany square table in center, crystal lamps over head, rocking chairs at each window and between there were a marble top table, over which hung a square mirror hand painted wood and a diamond shaped mirror with pink roses.  Bank of mother’s chair, a radiator over which hung Mother’s painting of the H. O. Walkers Sheepwashing in Brittany.  Father’s desk beside the sewing room (this room had been my grandmother’s bedroom, where she died, when I was 7.)  A yellow plush reclining sofa under the mantle piece on which in the center was a clock with an iron horse on top and at either end a Dresden shepherd and shepherdess.  Over the mantle was mother’s painting of a robin’s nest with 3 eggs on an apple blossom branch.
The third door led into the dining room with six doors, two were cupboards, one by the radiator, a book cupboard, the one beyond the two windows under which was a couch, a two way cupboard for the dishes by which we could set the table.  The North room was a store room.  This was the bathroom for Jonathan and still contained a wash basin with a tank for water which ran into a commode, a forerunner of today’s toilet.  The kitchen was big.  A wood box at left, stove cupboards, shelf for lamps which had to be cleaned and filled daily, window , kitchen sink, door the pantry (as big as some present day kitchens).  Up stairs was a pump to save going after water.  The well was just outside the kitchen door.  This ran dry sometimes and we would have to cart water from the old Red house.  We lived up over Grandmother from the time Forest was born.  Everett and Sylvia were born there.  Father was Agent for the mill and for a time they lived in Plainfield, NJ.  Then when Orpha was born, they lived at High Bridge, NY (where Yankee Stadium now is).  Sylvia remembered that Mother was pushing the baby carriage with Everett and she hanging onto the sides with their Great Dane beside them, when an elephant from the Manhattan side broke loose from the circus and came charging toward the bridge.  They fled back across.  Bill was born here.  When the family came back to Ashaway they lived in the Liza Taylor house up stairs.  Grandmother must have taken pity on them for Forest was born in the upstairs apartment, so was I (Dorothy), Nat and Elliot.  After Jonathan moved into the new blue plastered house the old Red house was a boarding school for 2 years, then the Academy was built (now the parish house for the town).  The Academy lasted 12 years (Alan Palmeter was the principal – Father’s life long friend).  Then the town took it over for a Public School.  At the time of the Academy, Grandmother and Willie Rogers, Grandmother’s twin brother’s son, same age as Father. Grandmother’s twin named Williams Rogers (after his mother’s family related to Roger Williams).  Father’s full name was Williams after Uncle Williams, her twin.  John Holdredge, Rachel’s son lived there and went to school.  Rachel was Martha’s sister, I think.
Grandmother had a cottage in the Ashaway Beach at Quonacantaug and in Florida.  She sent Aunt Sylvia to a finishing school (Miss Garrots School for Girls in Boston).  At 18, Sylvia had a big church wedding to Elliot Salisbury, a dentist and who died of TB shortly after the marriage.  Sylvia lived to the age of 33, died in the fall, shortly after my father and mother were married, August 4, 1880.

 
My father was sent to New York DeRuyter Academy at the age of 14.  He had grown to his full height 6 ft and was very slim.  He was encouraged to run for exercise.  Grandmother was afraid of TB.  He ran each day, first to the gate and back then down the lane to the bars of the cow lane, then to the brook then to the top of the hill or woodland.  He strengthened his lungs.  I imagine he kept it up till he was thru school.  Then he was sent to Alfred University, a Sabbaterian College.  He was a good student.  He said he had geometrical problem, he worked and worked on, went to sleep, woke up with the whole thing solved correctly, got up and wrote it down.  He knew Pauline at Alfred but did not date her.  She was engaged to Charles White, who later went to Florida and committed suicide.

Mother went to places with her sister Amelia (who for 16 years was head of the Art Department at Alfred), Chicago, Washington, New York, Boston to study the masters and to copy their works as a technique.

Pauline and William

My mother did not meet my father at the World’s Fair – the centennial 1876 at Phila.  She went there with Aunt Amelia Stillman.  She was 22 then.  Father went to the Centennial with a group of young men about his age (22) by boat from Westerly R.I.  They had hired a boat to go by the Sound then thru the Raritan River and Canals to Philadelphia – a memorable jolly occasion.  Then when Aunt Amelia took Mother to Boston to copy great artists, they stopped on their way back to Ashaway:  William proposed and they were married in August 4, 1880.  Mother got her wedding clothes at New York, a lovely grey heavy silk with cream satin embroidered trimming and a long train.  She was a beauty always, tall, carried herself so like a queen, a real lady.

Mother’s family lived in a lovely old home in Alfred, New York.  It had a big kitchen with an exit onto a lovely garden above the brook a sloping hill in back on top of which was a sugar bush.  I think her father, Phineas Stillman must have owned the whole section ¼ mile above, for Uncle Albert Stillman lived up there and next to his place was an apple orchard.  Greenings were sent to us from it.  Mother owned that lot and Bill inherited it.  The only property he claimed and sold after mother’s death.  My mother’s father was Phineas, who married Orpha Crandall, her one sister married a Post of Post Toasties fame and Amanda Crandall who married a Prescott, Episcopal minister in Newport, R.I. when he died later married William C. Burdick, an old sweetheart who wife died.

The children of Phineas and Orpha were Amelia (talented artist), she taught art at Alfred for 16 years.

Albert who ran a farm, married Celestia, had two sons, Luin and Clarke.

Eleanor, who went to Kentucky and the age of 16 to teach, met a young Captain in the Northern Army, who escorted her with other to get North to Chicago, even hiding in the Mammoth Cave in Kentucky which was then during the Civil War used as an underground railroad.  Aunt was so offish with this Captain Allan Ellsworth who boarded in the same house with her that the lady of the house told her if she was not more polite to the man she could board somewhere else.  Uncle Ellsworth was a prisoner of war at Andersonville for two years.  This ruined his health yet Aunt Ella said he was such a wonderful man, never complaining.  They had been married during, had a military wedding with swords crossed under which the bride and groom walked from or to the alter in the Seventh Day Baptist church in Alfred.  He was a Colonel at the end of the war and she always called him Colonel Ellsworth.  I know more of her because she helped my family. 

Bill lived with her 1906-1912.  For two years she, Bill and Forest together, for Forest went to Alfred from 1910-1914, she wanted all the children to get a college education and was glad to help the two boys who in turn worked to help her.  She had me come my first year at Alfred, as Forest was there.  We washed and cleaned, did dishes, etc. to help us.  Then my junior year, she had me again as her health was better.  Sylvia came to help her as did Ella and Clark.  Sylvia had to quit as she had a breakdown.  I was living at the Senior House that year, got engaged and Aunt Ella gave a birthday party for me and showed she was better.  When she was sick in the Hornell Hospital, Mother insisted that I should go up and see her instead of coming home for Christmas.  She was 34 when she died.

The third daughter was Mary, who was a musician and taught music pupils.  Some over in Wellsville.  She married a widower Mr. Brown, a conductor on the Erie Railroad, had two children Mable, a teacher in New York City who often came to visit R.I.  She married and had a son Ezra Merrill who now lives near Boston.  And a son William Brown a tailor who inherited the old house and was a favorite of students.  They took him to NYC on a happy holiday.  He was so kind to so many there.

 Williams was a very courteous gentleman, a servant of the community. He worked at a business mens club held ever the post office. He took a painting mother’s “California Sunset” as part of the decoration. He was a man folks could lean on. When any man was sick, folks came to have him stay nights with men like old Elder Stillman, Art Bailey, whom both Pastor Clayton Burdick and Father attended and when Art was so weak Father Went outdoors and came back in and said to Pastor Burdick

“Put on your over­coat and we will open the windows wide and give him a good breath of air”  They did and Art began to breath naturally again. When old black Bill Johnson, who was lamp lighter for the town street lights, when kerosene used in the light, he spilled the kerosene which caught his clothes on tire and burned him critically, Papa felt so bad. Then when Lloyd Crandall was sick with Pneumonia, his wife Mary said if only they could have gotten Mr. Wells, she was sure Lloyd would have lived. Papa would have made a wonderful Doctor. He nursed all the members of our family when we were sick, except when we kids had measles, whooping cough, and mumps. All four of us younger ones were put in my mother’s room whore she looked after us. Mother was sick, she would not let Father out of her sight for long. Sylvia had the same qualities as Papa in looking after sick people and became a practical nurse for years.

 Papa was a commissioner of roads and had a set—to with Mr. Frank Hill who wanted to run the town of Hopkinton and father withdrew from politics and at the time he withdrew from the church, he was so mad at Mr. Hill who ran the church.  Father could not stand seeing him get up and pray and be so sanctimonious.  Papa taught us all to be good, honest, trustworthy, clean minded boys and girls.  He was very stern and very strict.  We had to mind quickly, cheerfully, say yes sir and no sir, yes mam and no mam thank you, please, excuse me, from the dining table.  Chi1dren should be seen and not heard at the meals. He said. He always served my mother first. When we had company the boys put on coats. When father was working in New York, we kissed him goodbye and hello. He always said in me “Be a good girl” to all of us. Mind your mother. Everybody respected him. To see him and mother walkup the street people remarked “What a handsome couple”.  They walked arm in arm so tall and straight.  Beautiful people indeed, inside and out.

 I was so blesses to be a product of such good people and to have five brothers and 2 sisters who were full of living kindness and high principals.  Father spanked us seldom but when we needed it.  If we fought, Forest or I or Nat and I, Father made us kiss and make up.  I’d feel like biting them sometimes but I obeyed Papa. I remember only three spankings, one was sliding down the mahogany bannister, one climbing up the drawers to the top of the bureau and scribbling on the marble top, one swinging on his office gate. I can see that it was not the banister, the top of the bureau or the gate, but the danger involved his worry.  He always prefaced a spanking with “This is going to hurt me more than it hurts you”.  The first spanking for Skip was after he took Elliot up the street at the age of two, and we were all hunting for the baby frantically when Skip came back from the walk.  Father got his razor strap and whipped him with all of the rest of us, Mother, Nat, even Elliott and me crying, but Skip never made a sound, Papa said if any one of us over got whipped at School he would get another whipping when he got home. Bill got a thrashing once but no one ever let Papa know,. we were afraid of Papa but he was the most gentle, considerate, loving man who did all he could to take care of his family, he was affectionate and kind. People who worked for him at the Mill had such high Praise for him, losing out for himself in his generosity to others.  A wonderful man.

 Corrine and Pauline were twins, the youngest of the family and naturally the big girls did many things for them. The daguerreotypes of then at two in cute dresses low necked and long, then later at eleven like little women, long and very full made them look adorable.  Jeanne Wells Winder has these pictures. Jeanne also had the pictures of Pauline in her wedding gown. Mother was married at 25. Corrine went to Emerson School of Elocution at Boston. At 38 she married John Rudiger, a Civil Engineer who had been in South America for some years and had worked on the Holland Tunnel, and lived in Floral Park where my mother also owned property. As mother needed extra cash, Uncle Jack sold some acreage for her, the need to put electric lights (which Nat with the help of Ray Chester, an electrician) did from cellar to attic.

 Mother had a happy childhood and traveled to Chicago, Boston, New York and Washington, Philadelphia. Aunt Corrinne went around giving elocution programs until she was 33 and when she married. Mother said all the sisters were gifted but she, I think she did all things well. She gave to her family and to Father the best of her life. Her Ideals were so high and she entered activities at home at school, at church. She attended school programs when no other parents did, she was proud of everything her children did and when Allan lived with his grandparents, She went to school to attend some special that the teacher put on, or if Allan were to do a special thing.  She worked with a cultural group, when Sylvia was little, for Sylvia said she would sit on the top stair and listen to the music that was being played or sung.  Then we had our own musical evening with Mother at the piano, Papa singing baritone and all of us singing along such songs as Rocked in the Cradle of the Deep.  Papa would sing way down low, Listen to the mocking bird, Jerusalem, The lost Chord, Down where the cotton blossom grow.  So many old songs. 

 We would all play bid wist. When Papa came home from New York, we could smell his cigar as we came in the door from prayer meeting. Saturday night Papa would always play games with us like Blind Mans Bluff, some go, come Hide and Seek and then cards with the grown ups.  Mama was Sabbath School Superintendent, President of the Ladies Sewing Circle, who helped make money for the Seventh Day Church.  Mother saw to it that we all went to the Sabbath School Church Junior Christian Endeavor Senior Christian Endeavor and Friday night Prayer Meeting and on time.  Mother would go ahead with the children for Papa would be after.  Some Sabbath afternoons Papa would take us for a ride in the surrey or sleigh.  Some time when Church came first and Sabbath School second, papa would get the meal.  He made a ground hash and a tasty soup, which had a delicious flavor.  Always he served Mama first then we the children.

 Papa was an old fashioned gent1eman always; considerate of Mama. He and Mama would walk up the street arm in arm.  People said they were such a handsome couple.  We had to say yes sir and no sir and yes mam and no mam to older people.  We could not talk at the dining table.  Children were to be seen and not heard.  Excuse me before we could leave the table.  We often had company and if the company was a minister, we had gravy.  I often think how my mother had to plan, cook and organize a meal.  Home made cakes, pies, bread, puddings, vegetables, meats, baked beans, Friday nights and Brown Bread, Oyster stew Sabbath morning chickens or roasts.  We all were brought up to help with the dishes, cleaning, cooking, care of lamps care of rooms, but Mother was the organizer and did so quietly we fell in place.  Our favorite meal was Rhode Island Johnnycakes and dried beef gravy with new potatoes.

We were so blessed to have such wonderful parents, good, kind and loving.

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April 22, 2010 – Relatives I’m Searching For April 22, 2010

Today is about relatives I’m looking for.

Let’s start with the Kranz family.   My Great Grandfather is John Fitz (Johann) Kranz.  He was born December 10, 1873 in German.  He married Amalia Fabrici.  They had my Grand Uncle Wilhelm Frederich Kranz.  H was born July 10, 18999 in Manhattan, NY and died in December 1984 in Flushing, Queens, NY.  I have information that Wilhelm had a daughter named Marion Kranz.  I don’t know who his wife was, just the name of a daughter named Marion.    So If you know Marion Kranz or are a relative of hers, please contact me as we’d love to find out what happened to Wilhelm’s family.  You can contact me by hitting the leave a comment link at the bottom of this post.

My Great Grandfather, John Fitz (Johann) Kranz had another son names John A. Kranz Jr.   John Jr. was born April 29, 1902 in Manhattan, NY.  He married Lilian Roth about 1922 in New York City.  They had a daughter named Jacqueline Kranz who was born about 1928 in New York City.  Are you related to Jacqueline Kranz?  If so, please contact me.  John Jr. Died November 2, 1990 in Baltimore, MD.  I have information that Lillian Roth Kranz died in Sunnyside, NY.

Here are the Geoghan I’m looking for.  My Great Grandfather Thomas H. Geoghan had a son Thomas F. Geoghan.  Thomas F was born April 4, 1887 in Unionville, CT.  He married a woman named Josephine sometime before 1916.  They had a daughter named Mary Geoghan about 1916.   I’m looking for Mary Geoghan or a relative of hers.  If you’re related to Mary, please contact me by clicking on the Leave a Comment link below.

I’m hoping that some of their relatives will google their names and find this page.   So if you’re a relative of mine, I’ve got a lot of info for you and boy, would I like to meet you!

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April 21, 2010 – Old Rogers Cemetery in Waterford April 21, 2010

Today’s CEMETERY OF THE DAY is……Old Rogers Cemetery, Waterford, CT , 2 Shore Road, Waterford, CT.  I uploaded all the photos I have of this cemetery on Flickr.  I believe you click on my Flickr photos to the right of this.

Children of Jonathan Rogers Jr. and Judith Potter:

Rogers, Elder Nathan Sr.(May 6, 1718 – Mar 1794) 5th Great Grand Uncle

*Rogers, Capt. David (Mar 8, 1719 – Oct 17, 1803) 5th Great Grand Father

*Rogers, Jonathan Sr.(Nov 10, 1760 – Sep 18, 1824) 1st Cousin 6Xs Removed (Jonathan Sr. was the son of Elder Nathan Rogers Sr. and Hannah Crandall)

*Rogers, Humility (Milly) Greene(Apr 9, 1757 – Mar 8, 1804) 2nd Cousin 5Xs Removed And also w/o Jonathan Rogers Sr.

Children of Capt. David Rogers and Grace Lester:

*Rogers, Ezekiel (Dec 7, 1744 – Sep 12, 1781) 4th Great Grand Uncle (Ezekiel was the son of Capt. David Rogers above and Grace Lester)

*Rogers, Zebulon Sr.(Jul 3, 1757 – Mar 19, 1829)4th Great Grand Uncle (Zebulon’s children Esther & David Rogers are buried at West Neck Cemetery)

*Rogers, Sarah Greene (Aug 14, 1755 – May 24, 1842)2nd Cousin 5Xs Removed   And also w/o Zebulon Rogers Sr.

Rogers, Paul Sr.            (Aug 27, 1766 – Feb 12, 1864) 4th Great Grand Uncle

*Rogers, Mary (Polly) Barton (Aug 30, 1760 – Apr 20, 1852) w/o Paul Rogers Sr. (Paul and Mary’s son Silas Rogers is buried at West Neck Cemetery)

*Rogers, Capt Paul Jr.(May 1, 1790 – Apr 15, 1868) 1st Cousin 5Xs Removed (Paul is the son of Paul Rogers Sr. and Mary Barton)

*Rogers, Celindia Comstock (Nov 19, 1789 – Jan 8, 1861) w/o Paul Rogers Jr.

Children of Zebulon Rogers Jr. and Lydia Brooks:

*Rogers, Christopher(Sep 1818 – X)2nd Cousin 4Xs Removed

*Rogers, Zebulon III(Sep 25, 1815 – Oct 3, 1839)2nd Cousin 4Xs Removed

Children of Zebulon Rogers Jr. and Sarah Fox:

Rogers, Baby Boy(May 31, 1832 – June 1832)2nd Cousin 4Xs Removed

Rogers, Mary Tuthill(Feb 29, 1828 – Jan 18, 1833)2nd Cousin 4Xs Removed (Mary’s parents, Rev. Lester Tuthill Rogers and Susan Harper Crandall are in West Neck Cemetery)

Rogers, George (Aug 14, 1821 – Oct 3, 1823)2nd Cousin 4Xs Removed (George’s parents, David Rogers and Mary Potter are in West Neck Cemetery)

I also have the following people that I think are buried here.  I have information that they are buried in the Old Rogers Cemetery and they died in Waterford.

Rogers, Charles (Jun 1811 – Jul 6, 1811)2nd Cousin 4Xs Removed (Charles Rogers was the son of Zebulon Rogers Sr.  Zebulon is buried at West Neck Cemetery.  Charles may have been buried in the Old Rogers Cemetery because he died as children before the cemetery became filled.) 

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